Abstract

Serving as the last barrier to secure drinking water safety, household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) is perceived as an interim measure for removing pathogens from drinking water and reducing disease risk. In recent years, the application of HWTS has shown a growing trend, and its performance in controlling chemicals has also received much attention. Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of chemical disinfectants and precursors, and are present at sub-μg·L−1 or low-to-mid-μg·L−1 levels in drinking water. Although precursor control and disinfection operation modification could contribute to DBP mitigation to some degree, DBP removal after their formation emerges as an important strategy due to the ubiquitous existence of DBPs in distribution systems and tap water. In order to figure out how DBP concentrations vary during the residence time of drinking water in households, this review summarizes the effectiveness and mechanism of HWTS and combination technologies for DBP control in municipal tap water, and makes a comparison with regard to technologies implementing different removal mechanisms as well as DBPs possessing different natures. Based on these results, this article provides an insight into DBP risk assessment and human health protection.

Graphical Abstract

Graphical Abstract
Graphical Abstract
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