In this study, NiFe2O4 nanoparticles (NiFe2O4 NPs) were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), pHpzc and Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller methods. The size of the nanostructures according to TEM was obtained and found to be around 12 nm. The adsorption capacity of NiFe2O4 NPs was examined using cationic dyes of malachite green (MG), Nile blue A (NB) and Janus green B (JG) as the pollutant (adsorbate). The results demonstrated that the optimum pH, adsorbent dose and temperature were 7.0, 0.05 g and 25 °C, respectively. Adsorption equilibrium experiments were performed, and the results of fitting by the non-linear models signify that the Langmuir–Freundlich model can describe the isotherm of adsorption. Also, the kinetic data were modeled with recently developed models, and the data indicate that the adsorption kinetics follow the fractal-like pseudo-second order (r2>0.99). The method was applied to the removal of dyes in real samples. It was found that NiFe2O4 NPs is a highly efficient adsorbent for MG, NB and JG from aqueous solution, with a maximum capacity of 210 mg g–1, 167.8 mg g–1 and 102.6 mg g–1, respectively.

INTRODUCTION

One of the most dangerous pollutants in water is synthetic dyes. They are used extensively in the textile, plastic, cosmetic, food and paper and other industries. These dyes are stable in light and heat, and resistant to oxidation and biodegradation (Wang et al. 2012). Hence, dyes can lead to acute effects on exposed organisms and aquatic life due to their toxicity, abnormal coloration and the reduction in photosynthesis (Chang et al. 2011; Satapanajaru et al. 2011). So the removal of dyes in water samples is important. Attention has been paid to physical (adsorption, membrane filtration, and ion exchange), chemical (oxidation, electrochemical degradation, and ozonation), and biological techniques for removal of dyes from wastewater, of which adsorption is efficient and economical (Li et al. 2012; Zhang et al. 2014).

A large number of adsorbents, such as porous carbon nanospheres/nanotubes, iron oxides, activated carbon, chitosan and core–shell nanoparticles, have been applied to remove dyes from wastewater (Gao et al. 2013; Ghaedi et al. 2014a; Kyzas et al. 2014).

In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with the general formula MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, etc.) are one of the most popular materials in analytical biochemistry, medicine, the removal of heavy metals and biotechnology, and have been increasingly applied to immobilize proteins, enzymes, and other bioactive agents due to their unique advantages (Sivakumar et al. 2012; Teymourian et al. 2013).

NiFe2O4 nanoparticles (NiFe2O4 NPs) are known as an adsorbent because of their good biocompatibility, strong super paramagnetic property, low toxicity, easy preparation and high adsorption ability (Khosravi & Eftekhar 2013). NiFe2O4 NPs with an inverse spinel structure shows ferrimagnetism that originates from the magnetic moment of anti-parallel spins between Fe3+ ions at tetrahedral sites and Ni2+ ions at octahedral sites. NiFe2O4 NPs exhibit high surface area and low mass transfer resistance. Moreover, the magnetic behavior of these nanoparticles depends mostly on their size (Patil et al. 2014).

In the present study, NiFe2O4 NPs were used for the removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solution. In batch tests, different parameters such as pH, contact time, amount of adsorbent and temperature were optimized for the adsorption process. Based on these studies, the isotherm and kinetics of adsorption were evaluated. Finally, the NiFe2O4 NPs were applied for the removal of dyes from water and food samples.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Apparatus and reagents

All chemicals and reagents were purchased from Merck (Darmstadt, Germany). Stock solutions of dyes (10–3 mol L–1) were prepared by dissolving the appropriate amount of their powder in double-distilled water (DDW). Dye solutions with initial concentrations of 40–500 mg L–1 were prepared by diluting the stock solution in appropriate proportions. Figure 1 shows the structure of the investigated dyes. DDW was used for all experiments.
Figure 1

Chemical structure of dye molecules: (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG.

Figure 1

Chemical structure of dye molecules: (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG.

The concentration of dye in the solutions was measured using a UV–Vis spectrophotometer (Lambda 45, Perkin-Elmer, USA). A pH meter (780, Metrohm, Switzerland) equipped with a combined Ag/AgCl glass electrode was used for pH measurements. The crystal structure of the synthesized materials was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) (ADP2000 ITALSTRUCTURE, Italy) at ambient temperature. The structure of the NiFe2O4 NPs was characterized by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) (CM10, 100 KV, Philips). The elemental analysis was measured by scanning electron microscope energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) (XL30, Philips, The Netherlands). The specific surface area was defined by N2 adsorption–desorption porosimetry (77 K) using a porosimeter (Bel, Japan).

Synthesis of NiFe2O4 NPs

The NiFe2O4 samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. In a typical synthesis, a 0.2 M (20 mL) solution of iron nitrate [(Fe(NO3)3.9H2O)] and a 0.1 M (20 mL) solution of nickel nitrate [(Ni(NO3)2.6H2O)] were prepared and vigorously mixed under stirring for 1 h at 80 °C, and 0.2 g of polyethylene oxide was added into the solution as a capping agent. Subsequently, 5 mL of hydrazine hydrate (NH2·NH2·H2O) was added drop by drop into the solution, and brown precipitates were formed. Finally, the precipitates were separated by centrifugation and dried in a hot air oven for 4 h at 100 °C. The acquired substance was annealed for 10 h at 300 °C.

Point of zero charge pH

The point of zero charge pH (pHpzc) for the adsorbents was determined by introducing 0.05 g of NiFe2O4 NPs into eight 100 mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 0.1 M NaNO3 solution. The pH values of the solutions were adjusted to 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 using solutions of 0.01 mol L–1 HNO3 and NaOH. The solution mixtures were allowed to equilibrate in an isothermal shaker (25 °C) for 24 h. The final pH was measured after 24 h. The pHpzc is the point where the pHinitial = pHfinal.

Adsorption experiment

Dye removal experiments with 0.05 g of NiFe2O4 NPs were performed in 25 mL stoppered conical flasks containing 10 mL of dye solution, at 40 mg L–1. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 7.0 using 0.1 mol L–1 HCl and/or 0.1 mol L–1 NaOH solutions. The mixture was shaken at different time intervals (3–45 min) to facilitate adsorption of the dyes on the nanoparticles at 150 rpm at a temperature of 25 °C. Then dye loaded NiFe2O4 NPs were separated with magnetic decantation, and residual concentrations of malachite green (MG), Nile blue A (NB) and Janus green B (JG) were determined by UV–visible spectrophotometry (Lambda 45, Perkin-Elmer, USA) at 615, 635 nm, and 618 nm, respectively, and the amount of dyes adsorbed per unit mass of adsorbent at equilibrium conditions, qe (mg g–1), was evaluated based on Equation (1): 
formula
1
where C0 and Ce are initial and equilibrium concentrations, respectively (mg L–1), V (L) is the volume of solution and W (g) is the weight of adsorbent.
Finally, the removal efficiency for each dye was calculated using Equation (2): 
formula
2
where C0 and Ce are the initial and final dye concentrations (mg L−1).

Preparation of real samples

In order to demonstrate the applicability and reliability of the method for real samples, four samples, including tap water, river water, and jelly samples, were prepared and analyzed. Tap water samples were taken from our research laboratory (Islamic Azad University, Hamedan, Iran), river water was collected in a 2.0 L PTFE bottle. All water samples were filtered through a filter paper (Whatman No. 40) to remove suspended particulate matter.

Powdered jellies (blueberry and aloe vera) were purchased from a supermarket in Hamedan (Iran). The preparation instructions for the powdered jellies box specified 160 g L–1. Solutions with 1.0 g L–1 of powdered jelly were prepared in water.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Characterization of NiFe2O4

The XRD pattern of NiFe2O4 NPs is shown in Figure 2. Furthermore, it can be seen that all the diffraction peaks of NiFe2O4 may be assigned to spinel type NiFe2O4 (JCPDS 54-0964). The peaks at the 2θ values of 30.1, 35.3, 43.0, 53.7, 56.5, and 62.4° can be indexed to (111), (220), (311), (400), (422), (511) and (440) crystal planes of spinel NiFe2O4, respectively. The average crystallite size (D in nm) of NiFe2O4 NPs was determined from the XRD pattern according to the Scherrer equation: 
formula
3
where is the wavelength of the X-ray radiation (1.5406Å), is a constant taken as 0.89, is the diffraction angle and is the full width at half maximum. The average size of the NiFe2O4 NPs was calculated as around 15 nm. The TEM micrograph and calculated histogram of the NiFe2O4, as shown in Figure 3, revealed that the diameter of the synthesized NiFe2O4 NPs was around 12 nm. The particle size measured directly from the TEM micrograph agrees with that determined by the XRD results. Figure 4 shows a typical SEM-EDX elemental analysis of NiFe2O4 NPs. The results demonstrate that only Ni, Fe and O appear in NiFe2O4 NPs samples.
Figure 2

The XRD pattern of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 2

The XRD pattern of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 3

(a) TEM micrograph and (b) calculated histogram of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 3

(a) TEM micrograph and (b) calculated histogram of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 4

SEM-EDX spectrum of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 4

SEM-EDX spectrum of NiFe2O4 NPs.

Specific surface areas are commonly reported as Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface areas obtained by applying the theory of BET to nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms measured at 77 K. This is a standard procedure for the determination of the specific surface area of a sample. The specific surface area of the sample is determined by physical adsorption of a gas on the surface of the solid, and by measuring the amount of adsorbed gas corresponding to a monomolecular layer on the surface. The data are treated according to the BET theory (Brunauer et al. 1938). The results of the BET method showed that the average specific surface area of NiFe2O4 NPs was 63.7 m2 g−1. It can be concluded from these values that the synthesized nanoparticles have relatively large specific surface areas.

Effect of initial pH

The influence of pH of the aqueous solution is one of the main factors in the removal process. The effect of pH on the adsorption of MG, NB and JG onto NiFe2O4 NPs was studied at range of 2.0–9.0 for an initial dye concentration of 40 mg L–1. It was observed from Figure 5(b) that the percentage of adsorption of dyes increased with an increase in the solution pH for all the three dyes studied. The maximum adsorption capacity of cationic dyes was observed at pH 7.0 and an increase in pH (>7.0) did not significantly change the dye removal capacity.
Figure 5

(a) The determination of the point of zero charge of the NiFe2O4 NPs. (b) Effect of solution pH on the removal percentage of dyes by NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 5

(a) The determination of the point of zero charge of the NiFe2O4 NPs. (b) Effect of solution pH on the removal percentage of dyes by NiFe2O4 NPs.

As observed in Figure 5(a), the point of zero charge for NiFe2O4 NPs is 7.0. The removal efficiencies of MG, NB and JG (cationic dyes) were low at pH < 7.0 (pHPZC of NiFe2O4 NPs). The obvious decrease in removal might be attributed to the repulsive forces between the positive surface charge of NiFe2O4 NPs and the positive charge of the cationic dye. When the pH > 7.0, the removal of MG, NB and JG increased, this was put down to the attractive force of the negative surface charge of NiFe2O4 NPs and the positive charge of the dye. The decrease in the adsorption of dyes on NiFe2O4 NPs with a decrease in the solution pH might be attributed to competitive adsorption with the hydrogen ions at lower pH conditions.

Effect of adsorbent dose

Adsorbent dose is another important parameter because it determines the capacity of an adsorbent for a given initial concentration of adsorbate. The effect of the adsorption of dyes on the amount of NiFe2O4 NPs was studied at a temperature of 25 °C and at pH 7.0 by adding various amounts of adsorbent in the range of 0.01–0.08 g in contact with 40 mg L−1 of dyes. As shown in Figure 6, the adsorption of dyes increased with the increase in adsorbent dose, and reached a maximum level at a dose of 0.05 g. This observation can be explained by the increase in the surface area and availability of more active sites for adsorption. Therefore, 0.05 g of adsorbent was used in all experiments.
Figure 6

Effect of dose of NiFe2O4 NPs on the removal percentage of dyes.

Figure 6

Effect of dose of NiFe2O4 NPs on the removal percentage of dyes.

Adsorption kinetic

Agitation time was one of the prime factors influencing the adsorption process. The influence of adsorption time on the adsorption capacity of the three dyes is shown in Figure 7. It can be seen that qt increases rapidly during the initial adsorption stage, which was attributed to vacant surface sites available for adsorption. Subsequently, the diminishing availability of the remaining active sites and the decrease in the driving force led to the slow adsorptive process, and finally equilibrium was reached after approximately 10 min, 20 min and 15 min for MG, NB and JG, respectively, for an initial dye concentration of 40 mg L–1. Also, the data presented in Figure 7 indicate the adsorption rate and the amount of dye adsorbed increases by increasing the initial dye concentration.
Figure 7

Experimental kinetic data for the adsorption of (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG by NiFe2O4 NPs at different initial concentrations. Lines represent the FL-PSO model fitted to the data.

Figure 7

Experimental kinetic data for the adsorption of (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG by NiFe2O4 NPs at different initial concentrations. Lines represent the FL-PSO model fitted to the data.

The results showed that when the adsorbent was isolated immediately without a contact process into the samples, the analytes were hardly adsorbed. Agitation caused an increase in the adsorption and desorption rates.

Adsorption kinetics was investigated to describe the dye adsorption rate and eventually explore the mechanism of adsorption and possible rate-controlling steps. In order to analyze the adsorption kinetics of MG, NB and JG by adsorbent, the pseudo-first order (PFO), pseudo-second order (PSO), Elovich (E), mixed 1,2-order (MOE), exponential (EXP) and fractal-like pseudo-second order (FL-PSO) models (Table 1), were tested.

Table 1

Kinetic model equations

Kinetic model Non-linear equation Reference 
PFO  Azizian (2004)  
PSO  Azizian (2004)  
 Piazinski et al. (2009)  
EXP  Haerifar & Azizian (2013)  
MOE  Marczewski (2010)  
FL-PSO  Haerifar & Azizian (2012)  
Kinetic model Non-linear equation Reference 
PFO  Azizian (2004)  
PSO  Azizian (2004)  
 Piazinski et al. (2009)  
EXP  Haerifar & Azizian (2013)  
MOE  Marczewski (2010)  
FL-PSO  Haerifar & Azizian (2012)  

The results of fitting are listed in Table 2. According to the obtained correlation coefficients (r2) for different initial concentrations of dyes, the experimental kinetic data were best fitted with the FL-PSO model. The following data obtained with the FL-PSO model indicate that the surface of the adsorbent is heterogeneous and the rate coefficient changes with time. It is also observed that the calculated equilibrium adsorption value (qe) based on the FL-PSO model is close to the experimental equilibrium value. The result of fitting by FL-PSO is shown in Figure 7.

Table 2

Constant of kinetic models for adsorption of dyes onto NiFe2O4 NPs

Kinetic model dye C0 (mg L−1   F2 k1 (min−1k2 (g mg−1 min) qe (mg g−1r2 RMS error 
PFO MG 40 – – – – – – 0.335 – 22.61 0.9534 0.620 
60 – – – – – – 0.289 – 30.80 0.9820 0.607 
90 – – – – – – 0.235 – 44.43 0.9733 1.26 
PSO 40 – – – – – – – 0.023 24.23 0.9944 0.214 
60 – – – – – – – 0.013 33.38 0.9858 0.540 
90 – – – – – – – 0.006 49.05 0.9797 1.09 
40 0.350 – – – 290.2 – – – – 0.9220 0.802 
60 0.225 – – – 162.6 – – – – 0.8934 1.48 
90 0.130 – – – 86.80 – – – – 0.9085 2.33 
EXP 40 – – – 0.246 – – – – 22.70 0.9725 0.476 
60 – – – 0.211 – – – – 30.96 0.9930 0.377 
90 – – – 0.169 – – – – 44.77 0.9872 0.873 
MOE 40 – – – – – 9.42 0.187 – 22.91 0.9847 0.379 
60 – – – – – 0.644 0.141 – 31.22 0.9965 0.285 
90 – – – – – 0.610 0.120 – 45.18 0.9855 0.987 
FL-PSO 40 – 1.16 0.020 – – – – – 23.76 0.9965 0.179 
60 – 1.25 0.009 – – – – – 31.91 0.9981 0.209 
90 – 1.39 0.005 – – – – – 47.03 0.9897 0.846 
PFO NB 40 – – – – – – 0.256 – 20.22 0.9336 0.837 
60 – – – – – – 0.203 – 28.95 0.9772 0.837 
90 – – – – – – 0.162 – 41.92 0.9507 2.003 
PSO 40 – – – – – – – 0.017 22.22 0.9974 0.165 
60 – – – – – – – 0.008 32.51 0.9971 0.296 
90 – – – – – – – 0.004 48.34 0.9962 0.553 
40 0.302 – – – 52.26 – – – – 0.9635 0.620 
60 0.176 – – – 31.32 – – – – 0.9496 1.24 
90 0.104 – – – 23.52 – – – – 0.9887 0.957 
EXP 40 – – – 0.182 – – – – 20.39 0.9649 0.608 
60 – – – 0.144 – – – – 29.27 0.9937 0.438 
90 – – – 0.112 – – – – 42.67 0.9771 1.36 
MOE 40 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 22.30 0.9966 0.201 
60 – – – – – 1.37 0.075 – 41.36 0.9997 0.091 
90 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 48.67 0.9956 0.635 
FL-PSO 40 – 0.918 0.017 – – – – – 22.64 0.9980 0.152 
 60 – 1.14 0.007 – – – – – 31.50 0.9989 0.189 
 90 – 0.837 0.004 – – – – – 51.89 0.9988 0.326 
PFO JG 40 – – – – – – 0.191 – 18.87 0.9978 0.183 
 60 – – – – – – 0.185 – 26.91 0.8940 1.73 
 90 – – – – – – 0.107 – 41.42 0.9930 0.904 
PSO  40 – – – – – – – 0.011 21.37 0.9711 0.672 
 60 – – – – – – – 0.007 30.58 0.9805 0.742 
 90 – – – – – – – 0.107 41.42 0.9930 0.904 
 40 0.256 – – – 15.86 – – – – 0.8926 1.297 
 60 0.177 – – – 21.71 – – – – 0.9977 0.253 
 90 0.080 – – – 9.17 – – – – 0.9771 1.64 
EXP  40 – – – 0.136 – – – – 19.08 0.9943 0.298 
 60 – – – 0.127 – – – – 27.35 0.9362 1.34 
 90 – – – 0.072 – – – – 42.73 0.9970 0.588 
MOE  40 – – – – – 0.061 0.183 – 18.89 0.9979 0.193 
 60 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 31.18 0.9747 0.907 
 90 – – – – – 2.20 0.066 – 94.79 0.9968 0.654 
FL-PSO  40 – 1.63 0.006 – – – – – 19.41 0.9994 0.103 
 60 – 0.588 0.007 – – – – – 39.40 0.9990 0.178 
 90 – 1.09 0.002 – – – – – 48.43 0.9951 0.810 
Kinetic model dye C0 (mg L−1   F2 k1 (min−1k2 (g mg−1 min) qe (mg g−1r2 RMS error 
PFO MG 40 – – – – – – 0.335 – 22.61 0.9534 0.620 
60 – – – – – – 0.289 – 30.80 0.9820 0.607 
90 – – – – – – 0.235 – 44.43 0.9733 1.26 
PSO 40 – – – – – – – 0.023 24.23 0.9944 0.214 
60 – – – – – – – 0.013 33.38 0.9858 0.540 
90 – – – – – – – 0.006 49.05 0.9797 1.09 
40 0.350 – – – 290.2 – – – – 0.9220 0.802 
60 0.225 – – – 162.6 – – – – 0.8934 1.48 
90 0.130 – – – 86.80 – – – – 0.9085 2.33 
EXP 40 – – – 0.246 – – – – 22.70 0.9725 0.476 
60 – – – 0.211 – – – – 30.96 0.9930 0.377 
90 – – – 0.169 – – – – 44.77 0.9872 0.873 
MOE 40 – – – – – 9.42 0.187 – 22.91 0.9847 0.379 
60 – – – – – 0.644 0.141 – 31.22 0.9965 0.285 
90 – – – – – 0.610 0.120 – 45.18 0.9855 0.987 
FL-PSO 40 – 1.16 0.020 – – – – – 23.76 0.9965 0.179 
60 – 1.25 0.009 – – – – – 31.91 0.9981 0.209 
90 – 1.39 0.005 – – – – – 47.03 0.9897 0.846 
PFO NB 40 – – – – – – 0.256 – 20.22 0.9336 0.837 
60 – – – – – – 0.203 – 28.95 0.9772 0.837 
90 – – – – – – 0.162 – 41.92 0.9507 2.003 
PSO 40 – – – – – – – 0.017 22.22 0.9974 0.165 
60 – – – – – – – 0.008 32.51 0.9971 0.296 
90 – – – – – – – 0.004 48.34 0.9962 0.553 
40 0.302 – – – 52.26 – – – – 0.9635 0.620 
60 0.176 – – – 31.32 – – – – 0.9496 1.24 
90 0.104 – – – 23.52 – – – – 0.9887 0.957 
EXP 40 – – – 0.182 – – – – 20.39 0.9649 0.608 
60 – – – 0.144 – – – – 29.27 0.9937 0.438 
90 – – – 0.112 – – – – 42.67 0.9771 1.36 
MOE 40 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 22.30 0.9966 0.201 
60 – – – – – 1.37 0.075 – 41.36 0.9997 0.091 
90 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 48.67 0.9956 0.635 
FL-PSO 40 – 0.918 0.017 – – – – – 22.64 0.9980 0.152 
 60 – 1.14 0.007 – – – – – 31.50 0.9989 0.189 
 90 – 0.837 0.004 – – – – – 51.89 0.9988 0.326 
PFO JG 40 – – – – – – 0.191 – 18.87 0.9978 0.183 
 60 – – – – – – 0.185 – 26.91 0.8940 1.73 
 90 – – – – – – 0.107 – 41.42 0.9930 0.904 
PSO  40 – – – – – – – 0.011 21.37 0.9711 0.672 
 60 – – – – – – – 0.007 30.58 0.9805 0.742 
 90 – – – – – – – 0.107 41.42 0.9930 0.904 
 40 0.256 – – – 15.86 – – – – 0.8926 1.297 
 60 0.177 – – – 21.71 – – – – 0.9977 0.253 
 90 0.080 – – – 9.17 – – – – 0.9771 1.64 
EXP  40 – – – 0.136 – – – – 19.08 0.9943 0.298 
 60 – – – 0.127 – – – – 27.35 0.9362 1.34 
 90 – – – 0.072 – – – – 42.73 0.9970 0.588 
MOE  40 – – – – – 0.061 0.183 – 18.89 0.9979 0.193 
 60 – – – – – 0.999 0.0001 – 31.18 0.9747 0.907 
 90 – – – – – 2.20 0.066 – 94.79 0.9968 0.654 
FL-PSO  40 – 1.63 0.006 – – – – – 19.41 0.9994 0.103 
 60 – 0.588 0.007 – – – – – 39.40 0.9990 0.178 
 90 – 1.09 0.002 – – – – – 48.43 0.9951 0.810 

Adsorption isotherms and adsorption mechanism

An adsorption isotherm relates the relationship that exists between the amount of adsorbate adsorbed by the adsorbent (qe) and the adsorbate concentration left in solution after equilibrium is attained (Ce) at a constant temperature. In the present study, the data obtained from the equilibrium adsorption experiments, at temperatures of 25 °C, were analyzed using the Langmuir (L) (Langmuir 1918), Freundlich (F) (Freundlich & Heller 1939), Temkin (T) (Temkin & Pyzhev 1940), Redlich–Peterson (R–P) (Mane et al. 2007), Langmuir–Freundlich (L–F) (Azizian et al. 2007) and Brouers–Sotolongo (B–S) (Brouers et al. 2005) models.

The parameters of fitting by the non-linear method are presented in Table 3. It was found that the L–F isotherm model shows high correlation coefficients (r2 > 0.99) and a lower root mean square (RMS) error than other models. Another important criterion for evaluating the applicability of each model was based on the non-linear relative error (the best-fit isotherm). If the data from the model are similar to the experimental data, the RMS error will be a small number, if they are different, the RMS error will be a large number. Therefore, the good agreement between the adsorption data and the L–F model implies that the adsorption in all systems is heterogeneous. The results of fitting by this isotherm are shown in Figure 8. The adsorption capacities of MG, NB and JG on NiFe2O4 NPs were 210 mg g–1, 167.8 mg g–1 and 102.6 mg g–1, respectively. In Table 4, we compare the efficiency of the proposed adsorbent in the removal of cationic dyes from water with some other works. The results show that the NiFe2O4 NPs was efficient and had a much higher adsorption capability for cationic dyes.
Table 3

Obtained parameters for adsorption of dyes onto NiFe2O4 NPs

Isotherm Non-linear equation Parameters Cationic dyes
 
MG NB JG 
 qm(mg g–1199.1 161.9 106.2 
KL(L mg–10.104 0.025 0.027 
RL 0.194 0.050 0.481 
r2 0.9941 0.9970 0.9964 
RMS error 5.840 2.808 1.988 
 KF (L mg(1–(1/n))/g) 45.99 17.77 14.32 
n 0.303 0.389 0.341 
r2 0.9366 0.9619 0.9268 
RMS error 19.21 9.67 8.967 
 31.60 30.26 21.52 
3.089 0.413 0.314 
r2 0.9724 0.9742 0.9861 
RMS error 12.66 7.948 3.902 
B–S  qm (mg g–1188.7 142.7 94.25 
0.685 0.792 0.833 
KB-S(L mg–1)α 0.150 0.044 0.039 
r2 0.9956 0.9972 0.9953 
RMS error 5.334 2.712 2.481 
L–F  qm(mg g–1210.0 167.8 102.6 
KL(L mg–10.091 0.023 0.029 
N 1.162 1.067 0.912 
r2 0.9957 0.9973 0.9972 
RMS error 5.291 2.705 1.892 
R–P  KR–P (L g–123.69 4.150 2.687 
α′ (L mg–1)1/β 0.144 0.026 0.019 
0.960 0.994 1.04 
r2 0.9948 0.9970 0.9969 
RMS error 6.020 2.965 1.994 
Isotherm Non-linear equation Parameters Cationic dyes
 
MG NB JG 
 qm(mg g–1199.1 161.9 106.2 
KL(L mg–10.104 0.025 0.027 
RL 0.194 0.050 0.481 
r2 0.9941 0.9970 0.9964 
RMS error 5.840 2.808 1.988 
 KF (L mg(1–(1/n))/g) 45.99 17.77 14.32 
n 0.303 0.389 0.341 
r2 0.9366 0.9619 0.9268 
RMS error 19.21 9.67 8.967 
 31.60 30.26 21.52 
3.089 0.413 0.314 
r2 0.9724 0.9742 0.9861 
RMS error 12.66 7.948 3.902 
B–S  qm (mg g–1188.7 142.7 94.25 
0.685 0.792 0.833 
KB-S(L mg–1)α 0.150 0.044 0.039 
r2 0.9956 0.9972 0.9953 
RMS error 5.334 2.712 2.481 
L–F  qm(mg g–1210.0 167.8 102.6 
KL(L mg–10.091 0.023 0.029 
N 1.162 1.067 0.912 
r2 0.9957 0.9973 0.9972 
RMS error 5.291 2.705 1.892 
R–P  KR–P (L g–123.69 4.150 2.687 
α′ (L mg–1)1/β 0.144 0.026 0.019 
0.960 0.994 1.04 
r2 0.9948 0.9970 0.9969 
RMS error 6.020 2.965 1.994 
Table 4

Comparison of maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of different adsorbents for cationic dyes

Adsorbent Maximum adsorption capacity (mg g–1)
 
  
MG NB JG Reference 
NiO flowerlike nanoarchitectures 142.08 – – Wei et al. (2014)  
Cd(OH)2-NW-AC 80.64 – – Ghaedi & Mosallanejad (2014b)  
Oxide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon 142.87 – – Shamsizadeh et al. (2014)  
Natural clay – 42 – İyim & Güçlü (2009)  
Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes – – 56 Sobhanardakani et al. (2013)  
Maghemite modified by SDS – – 172 Afkhami et al. (2010)  
Mesoporous silica – – 61.82 Huang et al. (2011)  
NiFe2O4 NPs 210 167.8 102.6 This work 
Adsorbent Maximum adsorption capacity (mg g–1)
 
  
MG NB JG Reference 
NiO flowerlike nanoarchitectures 142.08 – – Wei et al. (2014)  
Cd(OH)2-NW-AC 80.64 – – Ghaedi & Mosallanejad (2014b)  
Oxide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon 142.87 – – Shamsizadeh et al. (2014)  
Natural clay – 42 – İyim & Güçlü (2009)  
Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes – – 56 Sobhanardakani et al. (2013)  
Maghemite modified by SDS – – 172 Afkhami et al. (2010)  
Mesoporous silica – – 61.82 Huang et al. (2011)  
NiFe2O4 NPs 210 167.8 102.6 This work 
Figure 8

Adsorption isotherms of (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG onto NiFe2O4 NPs. Lines represent the L–F model fitted to the data.

Figure 8

Adsorption isotherms of (a) MG, (b) NB and (c) JG onto NiFe2O4 NPs. Lines represent the L–F model fitted to the data.

Based on the results described, we propose that the mechanisms controlling the adsorption of MG, NB and JG on the NiFe2O4 NPs at solution pH 7.0 include: (i) electrostatic attraction between negatively charged NiFe2O4 NPs and positive dyes; and (ii) the cationic dyes can become adsorbed onto the NiFe2O4 NPs surface by coordination effect between metal ions and amine groups at the ends of dye molecules. At a low pH (pH < pHPZC), the surface of the NiFe2O4 NPs is positively charged, which may produce repulsion to positive cationic dyes and the adsorption of dyes onto NiFe2O4 NPs is due to coordination between NH2 on the surface of dyes and bivalence metal ions. At pH > pHPZC, the synergistic effects of electrostatic attraction and coordination could be ascribed to the high adsorption of MG, NB and JG onto NiFe2O4 NPs.

Effect of temperature

The effect of temperature on the removal of cationic dyes was tested at four temperatures (25, 35, 45, 55 °C). The results of these experiments are presented in Figure 9, and show that the removal percentage of MG, NB and JG by NiFe2O4 NPs decreased with increasing temperature. Therefore, it is indicated that the adsorption of these dyes onto NiFe2O4 NPs is an exothermic process. The decrease in the rate of adsorption with the increase in temperature may be attributed to the weakening of the adsorptive forces between the active sites of the adsorbents and the adsorbate species.
Figure 9

Effect of temperature on the removal percentage of dyes by NiFe2O4 NPs.

Figure 9

Effect of temperature on the removal percentage of dyes by NiFe2O4 NPs.

Adsorption of cationic dyes in real samples

A standard addition method was applied to the adsorption of cationic dyes of MG, NB and JG in real samples such as water or industrial wastewater using NiFe2O4 NPs. The samples were also analyzed after spiking with different concentrations of dyes. The results are given in Table 5. The results show that the method is suitable for the analysis of real samples.

Table 5

Results of adsorption of cationic dyes in various real samples using NiFe2O4 NPs adsorbent under the optimum conditions (n = 5)

Sample Dyes Added (μg L–1Found (μg L–1)a Recovery (%) 
Tap water MG 10 10.1 ± 0.04 101.0 
15 14.3 ± 0.32 95.3 
NB 10 9.9 ± 0.29 99.0 
15 14.8 ± 0.08 98.6 
JG 10 9.5 ± 0.15 95.0 
15 14.7 ± 0.58 98.0 
River water MG 10 9.8 ± 0.11 98.0 
15 15.4 ± 0.36 104.0 
NB 10 9.6 ± 0.05 96.0 
15 15.2 ± 0.15 102.0 
JG 10 10.3 ± 0.02 103.0 
15 15.1 ± 0.28 101.0 
Blueberry powdered jelly MG 25 26 ± 0.40 104.0 
50 51.3 ± 0.54 102.6 
NB 25 24.8 ± 0.23 99.2 
50 50.5 ± 0.47 101.0 
JG 25 25.2 ± 0.09 100.8 
50 48.7 ± 0.58 97.4 
Aloe vera powdered jelly MG 25 25.7 ± 0.13 102.8 
50 50.3 ± 0.31 100.6 
NB 25 24.1 ± 0.06 96.4 
50 49.5 ± 0.22 99.0 
JG 25 25.5 ± 0.19 102.0 
50 53.2 ± 0.54 106.4 
Sample Dyes Added (μg L–1Found (μg L–1)a Recovery (%) 
Tap water MG 10 10.1 ± 0.04 101.0 
15 14.3 ± 0.32 95.3 
NB 10 9.9 ± 0.29 99.0 
15 14.8 ± 0.08 98.6 
JG 10 9.5 ± 0.15 95.0 
15 14.7 ± 0.58 98.0 
River water MG 10 9.8 ± 0.11 98.0 
15 15.4 ± 0.36 104.0 
NB 10 9.6 ± 0.05 96.0 
15 15.2 ± 0.15 102.0 
JG 10 10.3 ± 0.02 103.0 
15 15.1 ± 0.28 101.0 
Blueberry powdered jelly MG 25 26 ± 0.40 104.0 
50 51.3 ± 0.54 102.6 
NB 25 24.8 ± 0.23 99.2 
50 50.5 ± 0.47 101.0 
JG 25 25.2 ± 0.09 100.8 
50 48.7 ± 0.58 97.4 
Aloe vera powdered jelly MG 25 25.7 ± 0.13 102.8 
50 50.3 ± 0.31 100.6 
NB 25 24.1 ± 0.06 96.4 
50 49.5 ± 0.22 99.0 
JG 25 25.5 ± 0.19 102.0 
50 53.2 ± 0.54 106.4 

aMean of five determinations ± standard deviation.

Desorption studies

In order to evaluate the possibility of regeneration and reuse of the NiFe2O4 NPs adsorbent, desorption experiments have been performed. A desorption experiment was carried out with different eluents such as methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, NaOH and a mixture of methanol and sodium hydroxide. For this purpose, 10 mL of desorbent solution was added to the 0.05 g dye loaded NiFe2O4 NPs in a beaker. The nanoparticles were collected magnetically from the solution. The concentration of dyes in the desorbed solution was measured by UV–Vis spectrophotometery. The results are given in Figure 10. The results showed that the best eluent for the recovery of the NiFe2O4 NPs was a mixture of 0.1 mol L–1 NaOH and methanol. Then, the adsorbent was washed with DDW and reused for dye adsorption. The results showed that the reusability of the adsorbent was greater than four cycles without any loss in its adsorption behavior.
Figure 10

Effect of type of eluting agent on recovery (%) for cationic dyes adsorbed on NiFe2O4.

Figure 10

Effect of type of eluting agent on recovery (%) for cationic dyes adsorbed on NiFe2O4.

CONCLUSION

NiFe2O4 NPs are synthesized by the co-precipitation method and characterized by XRD analysis and TEM. The average particle size of NiFe2O4 is about 12 nm. The obtained NiFe2O4 NPs powders were tested for dye removal from aqueous solutions.

Maximum removal percentages have been obtained in neutral pH, and the variation of the dyes’ uptake with the initial pH of the dye solution indicates that the main interaction between the dyes and the adsorbent is electrostatic attraction. The study of the effect of temperature on the adsorption of dyes by adsorbent indicated that the adsorption is an exothermic process. The equilibrium adsorption studies show that the equilibrium data follow the L–F isotherm, which indicates that the surface is heterogeneous. Also, the kinetics of dye adsorption onto the adsorbent follow the FL-PSO model, which indicate that the rate coefficient changes with time.

REFERENCES

REFERENCES
Azizian
S.
2004
Kinetic models of sorption: a theoretical analysis
.
J. Colloid Interface Sci.
276
,
47
52
.
Brunauer
S.
Emmett
P. H.
Teller
E.
1938
Adsorption of gases in multimolecular layers
.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
60
,
309
319
.
Chang
Y. P.
Ren
C. L.
Yang
Q.
Zhang
Z. Y.
Dong
L. J.
Chen
X. G.
Xuec
D. S.
2011
Preparation and characterization of hexadecyl functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles and its application in Rhodamine 6G removal
.
Appl. Surf. Sci.
257
,
8610
8616
.
Freundlich
H.
Heller
W.
1939
The adsorption of cis- and trans-Azobenzene
.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
61
,
2228
2230
.
Haerifar
M.
Azizian
S.
2012
Fractal-like adsorption kinetics at the solid/solution Interface
.
J. Phys. Chem. C
116
,
13111
13119
.
Huang
C. H.
Chang
K. P.
Ou
H. D.
Chiang
Y. C.
Wang
C. F.
2011
Adsorption of cationic dyes onto mesoporous silica
.
Micropor. Mesopor. Mater.
141
,
102
109
.
İyim
T. B.
Güçlü
G.
2009
Removal of basic dyes from aqueous solutions using natural clay
.
Desalination
249
,
1377
1379
.
Patil
J. Y.
Nadargi
D. Y.
Gurav
J. L.
Mulla
I. S.
Suryavanshi
S. S.
2014
Synthesis of glycinecombusted NiFe2O4 spinel ferrite: a highly versatile gas sensor
.
Mater. Lett.
124
,
144
147
.
Piazinski
W.
Rudzinski
W.
Plazinska
A.
2009
Theoretical models of sorption kinetics including a surface reaction mechanism: a review
.
J. Colloid Interface Sci.
152
,
2
13
.
Satapanajaru
T.
Chompuchan
C.
Suntornchot
P.
Pengthamkeerati
P.
2011
Enhancing decolorization of Reactive Black 5 and Reactive Red 198 during nano zero valent iron treatment
.
Desalination
266
,
218
230
.
Sivakumar
P.
Ramesh
R.
Ramanand
A.
Ponnusamy
S.
Muthamizhchelvan
C.
2012
Synthesis, studies and growth mechanism of ferromagnetic NiFe2O4 nanosheet
.
Appl. Surf. Sci.
258
,
6648
6652
.
Sobhanardakani
S.
Zandipak
R.
Sahraei
R.
2013
Removal of Janus Green dye from aqueous solutions using oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes
.
Toxicol. Environ. Chem.
95
(
6
),
909
918
.
Temkin
M. J.
Pyzhev
V.
1940
Recent modifications to Langmuir isotherms
.
Acta Physio. Chim.
12
,
217
222
.
Zhang
Y. R.
Shen
S. L.
Wang
S. Q.
Huang
J.
Su
P.
Wang
Q. R.
Zhao
B. X.
2014
A dual function magnetic nanomaterial modified with lysine for removal of organic dyes from water solution
.
Chem. Eng. J.
239
,
250
256
.