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Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 2

By
Neil Weinstein
Neil Weinstein
The Low Impact Development Center, Inc., 5010 Sunnyside Avenue, Suite 200 Beltsville, MD 20705, Phone: (301) 982-5559, Fax: (301) 982-1994, Email: nweinstein@lowimpactdevelopment.org
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Jennifer Cotting
Jennifer Cotting
University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center
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Dan Nees
Dan Nees
University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center
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Sara Downing
Sara Downing
Lee+Papa and Associates
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Jeff Lee
Jeff Lee
Lee+Papa and Associates
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Benjamin Tauber
Benjamin Tauber
Lee+Papa and Associates
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Ann English
Ann English
The Low Impact Development Center, Inc.
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Christopher Kloss
Christopher Kloss
The Low Impact Development Center, Inc.
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Charles Glass
Charles Glass
ETEC, L.L.C.
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Wayne C. Huber
Wayne C. Huber
Oregon State University
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Tracy Morgan
Tracy Morgan
Oregon State University
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IWA Publishing
Volume
8
ISBN electronic:
9781780403588
Publication date:
June 2009

Phase 1 of this project demonstrated the technical feasibility of using decentralized stormwater controls in urban areas for retrofits and controlling combined sewer overflows. This technical feasibility was illustrated by a number of early adopters using decentralized controls to complement their existing municipal stormwater and wastewater infrastructure. However, institutional and programmatic issues required further study to broaden the use of a distributed, decentralized stormwater approach. This research evaluates implementation strategies for incorporating decentralized controls into an infrastructure management system. The distributed nature and multiple environmental benefits of decentralized controls necessitate an integrated and inter-departmental management approach.

The results of this research identify various implementation strategies for incorporating decentralized controls into urban infrastructure management programs. Case studies and programmatic and regulatory examples detail alternatives to expedite the adoption of decentralized controls. Managing infrastructure by limiting demand is explored in the context of distributed controls. In addition, an evaluation of economic methods appropriate for assessing environmental costs and benefits is included to more fully capture the financial consideration of decentralized controls. Guidance for modeling decentralized controls with commonly used stormwater models is also provided.

This title belongs to WERF Research Report Series.

ISBN: 9781843393535 (Print)

ISBN: 9781780403588 (eBook)

Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction, Phase 2
By: Neil Weinstein, Jennifer Cotting, Dan Nees, Sara Downing, Jeff Lee, Benjamin Tauber, Ann English, Christopher Kloss, Charles Glass, Wayne C. Huber, Tracy Morgan
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2166/9781780403588
ISBN (electronic): 9781780403588
Publisher: IWA Publishing
Published: 2009

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