Abstract

An in-situ field study on two types of irrigation methods and three irrigation regimes was conducted in a sandy loam soil located at King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in 2015 and 2016. The study was to assess the effects of different irrigation methods on physiological and yield responses of tomato crops under water shortage conditions. The tested irrigation methods were surface drip irrigation (SDI) and subsurface drip irrigation (SSDI) systems. Irrigation treatments consisted of three strategies: (1) plants were irrigated with a water depth of 100% of the full irrigation supply; (2) plants were irrigated with a water depth of 80% of the full irrigation supply; and (3) plants were irrigated with a water depth of 60% of the full irrigation supply. Results indicated that water shortage significantly affected yield and quality response for each season. Over a 2-year average, yield increase was greatest in T1-SSDI followed by T2-SSDI and then T1-SDI. The yield response factor was 0.95 and 1.05 for SSDI and SDI, respectively. The highest water use efficiency values were obtained in T2-SSDI (16.3 kg m−3) and T1-SSDI (15.6 kg m−3), and the lowest ones, those estimated in T1-SDI (10.9 kg m−3) and T3-SDI (9.5 kg m−3).

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