Skip to Main Content

As a solid waste, sawdust is produced in large quantities at sawmills. It contains primarily lignin and cellulose. Sawdust has been used as an adsorbent for heavy metal removal and shows good removal (Shukla et al. 2002). Sawdust is obtained by cutting, grinding, drilling, sanding or by pulverising wood with a saw or other tool producing fine wood particles. Argun et al. (2007) used hydrochloric acid modified oak sawdust (Quercus coccifera) for the removal of chromium. This treatment increases the proportion of active surfaces and prevents the elution of tannin compounds that would stain treated water. The maximum removal efficiency reported was 84% for Cr(VI) at pH 3 and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1.70 mg/g for Cr(VI) at pH 3. Politi & Sidiras (2012) used pine sawdust modified with 0.11–3.6 N sulphuric acid for the removal of chromium and reported a maximum adsorption capacity of 20.3 mg/g and 86% removal at pH 2. Table 10 summarises the reported use of modified sawdust as an adsorbent for chromium removal from wastewater.

Table 10

Chromium removal using modified sawdust as an adsorbent

AdsorbentMetal concentration (mg/L)Optimum pHBest model fitContact time (min)Adsorbent dose (g/L)Adsorbent capacity (mg/g)Removal per cent (%)References
Hydrochloric acid modified oak sawdust (Quercus coccifera0.1–100 Langmuir, D–R isotherms 0–720 60 1.70 84% Argun et al. (2007)  
Sulphuric acid modified pine sawdust 15–75 Freundlich 240 20.3 – Politi & Sidiras (2012)  
AdsorbentMetal concentration (mg/L)Optimum pHBest model fitContact time (min)Adsorbent dose (g/L)Adsorbent capacity (mg/g)Removal per cent (%)References
Hydrochloric acid modified oak sawdust (Quercus coccifera0.1–100 Langmuir, D–R isotherms 0–720 60 1.70 84% Argun et al. (2007)  
Sulphuric acid modified pine sawdust 15–75 Freundlich 240 20.3 – Politi & Sidiras (2012)  

Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal