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Overall, 90% of the entire sample reported hiring emptiers as the dominant pit-emptying practice. For the 20% of households who had emptied their pits, 88% had hired pit-emptiers to do the job, paying on average BDT 322 (∼USD 4) for their services (Table 2). For the households that were yet to empty their pits, 92% planned to hire an emptier when their pits filled (Table 2).

Table 2

Pit emptying and sludge disposal in household study (n = 1,080 households)

MeanaStd. Error
Pit management of households who had emptied their pits (n = 216)b 
 % households that hired emptiers 0.88 0.06 
 Average amount paid for emptying to sweeper 322 44 
 % households where fecal sludge locally onsite 0.93 0.06 
Pit management of households yet to empty their pits (n = 864)c 
 % households planning to hire emptier when pit fills 0.92 0.03 
 % households that report sludge will be disposed of onsite 0.91 0.03 
 % households plan to build a new pit when old full 0.06 0.02 
MeanaStd. Error
Pit management of households who had emptied their pits (n = 216)b 
 % households that hired emptiers 0.88 0.06 
 Average amount paid for emptying to sweeper 322 44 
 % households where fecal sludge locally onsite 0.93 0.06 
Pit management of households yet to empty their pits (n = 864)c 
 % households planning to hire emptier when pit fills 0.92 0.03 
 % households that report sludge will be disposed of onsite 0.91 0.03 
 % households plan to build a new pit when old full 0.06 0.02 

aThe means are calculated by regressing responses of each household on a set of predetermined household characteristics, summarized in Table 1, to improve precision of estimates. Sampling weights are used in regressions, and standard errors are clustered.

bThe means are calculated using the subsample of households that had emptied their pits.

cThe means are calculated using the subsample of households that had not emptied their pits.

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