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Table 1

Description of geomorphological units

(I) EOLIAN PLAIN:
It includes the largest area of the study area. Eolian deposits. Relief gently undulated to flat with slopes of the order of 2% 
(II) FLUVIO-EOLIAN PLAIN:
Relief softly undulated. Slope values less than 0.5% (SE) and locally 3% (in dunes areas). It has present and paleo fluvial and eolian morphologies, occupied mainly by permanent lagoon bodies 
(III) FLUVIAL PLAIN:
Moderately undulating relief, almost flat in the area of wetlands, characterized by a structural control. It is composed of fluvial deposits related to the Rio Quinto River 
(I.1.) Sandy eolian plain: part of the large ‘Mar de Arena Pampeano’ eolian system of the late Pleistocene (Iriondo 1990), with large deflation forms, dune fields and sand deposits
I.1.a. Undulated relief with slopes of up to 2%. Old longitudinal dunes (late Pleistocene–Holocene), reworked by NE winds during the Little Ice Age (Tripaldi & Forman 2007) which formed parabolic dunes. Usually permanent lagoons and wetlands occupy the deflation corridors. The local remobilization of sands formed barjanoid chains (NW secondary winds)
I.1.b. Gently undulating plain of longitudinal dunes with SE–NW direction (local differences of 2–3 m), slopes lower than 2%. It presents depressions associated with old inter dune deflation corridors
I.1.c: Elongated topographic depressions that contain wetlands and lagoons, surrounded by hydro-halomorphic processes linked to the water table fluctuation
(I.2.) Structural block of Levalle: great regional hill associated with the ‘Tigre Muerto’ regional fault. Only a small sector of the southern part is observed in the study area 
(II.1.) Eolian plain with paleochannels and paleo-spills. It presents alluvial paleo-fans of the Rio Quinto River, from different climatic stages of the Upper Quaternary. In addition, there are erosive and accumulation eolian geoforms. In discontinuous paleochannels and deflation corridors there are lagoon bodies fed by the water table. Coarser grains appear in the sediments
(II.2). Paleo alluvial spills, poorly-drained: located north of the present river channel, is composed of paleochannels and spills of moderate sinuosity characterized by a poor drainage
(II.3) Tectonic depression of the Tigre Muerto:
It is a low area, with an outcropping or shallow water table level. It corresponds to the sunken block associated with the ‘Tigre Muerto’ fault, with general slope towards the SSE (in the order of 0.2%) and an asymmetric transversal profile. The area is partially covered by longitudinal dunes from the Middle to Upper Holocene. Current lagoons and wetlands environments are common 
(III.1) Fluvial strip: it has an average width of 1 km, reaching a maximum of 3 km near Villa Sarmiento town, where several levels of terraces can be identified. The present course exhibits moderate sinuosity, with high rates of deepening and lateral migration, mainly in recent years. The continuous anthropogenic channeling in La Amarga wetlands reinforced backward erosion processes. Water rapids are common in this sector
(III.2) ‘La Amarga’ old wetland, it is part of the lower basin of the Rio Quinto River. Presents a series of paleochannels and paleo spills related to the epoch in which the area acted as the base level of the river. Currently, this extensive paleo-wetland constitutes a transit area where the course has deepened (6–7 m) and exhibits active vertical incision and processes of lateral erosion. As a result, the spill/discharge area has been moved to more southeastern areas 
(I) EOLIAN PLAIN:
It includes the largest area of the study area. Eolian deposits. Relief gently undulated to flat with slopes of the order of 2% 
(II) FLUVIO-EOLIAN PLAIN:
Relief softly undulated. Slope values less than 0.5% (SE) and locally 3% (in dunes areas). It has present and paleo fluvial and eolian morphologies, occupied mainly by permanent lagoon bodies 
(III) FLUVIAL PLAIN:
Moderately undulating relief, almost flat in the area of wetlands, characterized by a structural control. It is composed of fluvial deposits related to the Rio Quinto River 
(I.1.) Sandy eolian plain: part of the large ‘Mar de Arena Pampeano’ eolian system of the late Pleistocene (Iriondo 1990), with large deflation forms, dune fields and sand deposits
I.1.a. Undulated relief with slopes of up to 2%. Old longitudinal dunes (late Pleistocene–Holocene), reworked by NE winds during the Little Ice Age (Tripaldi & Forman 2007) which formed parabolic dunes. Usually permanent lagoons and wetlands occupy the deflation corridors. The local remobilization of sands formed barjanoid chains (NW secondary winds)
I.1.b. Gently undulating plain of longitudinal dunes with SE–NW direction (local differences of 2–3 m), slopes lower than 2%. It presents depressions associated with old inter dune deflation corridors
I.1.c: Elongated topographic depressions that contain wetlands and lagoons, surrounded by hydro-halomorphic processes linked to the water table fluctuation
(I.2.) Structural block of Levalle: great regional hill associated with the ‘Tigre Muerto’ regional fault. Only a small sector of the southern part is observed in the study area 
(II.1.) Eolian plain with paleochannels and paleo-spills. It presents alluvial paleo-fans of the Rio Quinto River, from different climatic stages of the Upper Quaternary. In addition, there are erosive and accumulation eolian geoforms. In discontinuous paleochannels and deflation corridors there are lagoon bodies fed by the water table. Coarser grains appear in the sediments
(II.2). Paleo alluvial spills, poorly-drained: located north of the present river channel, is composed of paleochannels and spills of moderate sinuosity characterized by a poor drainage
(II.3) Tectonic depression of the Tigre Muerto:
It is a low area, with an outcropping or shallow water table level. It corresponds to the sunken block associated with the ‘Tigre Muerto’ fault, with general slope towards the SSE (in the order of 0.2%) and an asymmetric transversal profile. The area is partially covered by longitudinal dunes from the Middle to Upper Holocene. Current lagoons and wetlands environments are common 
(III.1) Fluvial strip: it has an average width of 1 km, reaching a maximum of 3 km near Villa Sarmiento town, where several levels of terraces can be identified. The present course exhibits moderate sinuosity, with high rates of deepening and lateral migration, mainly in recent years. The continuous anthropogenic channeling in La Amarga wetlands reinforced backward erosion processes. Water rapids are common in this sector
(III.2) ‘La Amarga’ old wetland, it is part of the lower basin of the Rio Quinto River. Presents a series of paleochannels and paleo spills related to the epoch in which the area acted as the base level of the river. Currently, this extensive paleo-wetland constitutes a transit area where the course has deepened (6–7 m) and exhibits active vertical incision and processes of lateral erosion. As a result, the spill/discharge area has been moved to more southeastern areas 
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