Skip to Main Content
Table 2

Estimated models for the preferences of male and female workers for working with FSF, compared with cow manure

AttributeModel 4, male workers (n = 456 choice sets)
Model 5, female workers (n = 553 choice sets)
Valuep-valueValuep-value
Dry 0.15 0.31 0.56 <0.01 
FSF −0.07 0.72 −0.28 0.18 
No health risks 0.46 <0.01 0.61 <0.01 
Tea powder texture − 0.08 0.57 − 0.35 0.02 
Wages 0.69 0.21 0.89 0.09 
Labeled as organic manure  
Omnivorous worker 0.43 0.02 0.35 0.05 
Vegetarian worker −0.06 0.78 −0.40 0.04 
No smell  
 Omnivorous worker −0.11 0.57 0.66 <0.01 
 Vegetarian worker 0.57 <0.01 0.63 <0.01 
AttributeModel 4, male workers (n = 456 choice sets)
Model 5, female workers (n = 553 choice sets)
Valuep-valueValuep-value
Dry 0.15 0.31 0.56 <0.01 
FSF −0.07 0.72 −0.28 0.18 
No health risks 0.46 <0.01 0.61 <0.01 
Tea powder texture − 0.08 0.57 − 0.35 0.02 
Wages 0.69 0.21 0.89 0.09 
Labeled as organic manure  
Omnivorous worker 0.43 0.02 0.35 0.05 
Vegetarian worker −0.06 0.78 −0.40 0.04 
No smell  
 Omnivorous worker −0.11 0.57 0.66 <0.01 
 Vegetarian worker 0.57 <0.01 0.63 <0.01 

Out of 839 workers (361 males and 478 females) interviewed, 674 (308 males and 366 females) participated in the preference modeling study. Each worker was presented with three choice sets (see, e.g., vpure 1). Each choice set had three options to choose. With 308 male workers × 3 choice sets per worker, we get 924 choice sets in total for males. Half of those choice sets (924/2 = 462) had cow manure as the third option, and the other half had chemical fertilizer. We have n as 456 (instead of 462) for males and 553 for females (instead of 549) because cow manure and chemical fertilizer were randomly assigned; the proportions were only probabilistically close to 0.5. Our n was also influenced by the workers who dropped out.

Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal