Township regulations played a crucial role in enforcing a particular building standard. The natives, however, were unable to attain the required standard. Thus, they constructed low-quality buildings in a specific portion of the city without access to sanitation amenities (Kironde 2006). The inability of low-income citizens to meet guideline requirements still exists today. The inability to comply with regulations has compelled them to live in unplanned areas just like they did during the colonial era (Tenga & Mramba 2015). The government rarely implements policies that advocate for low-income people to get plots in planned areas. Table 2 presents legislation that were used for sanitation management during the British colonial period.

Table 2

Legislation for sanitation during the British Rule in Tanganyika

Type of legislationRules made under the respective ordinancePurposeNature of service provision and impact on sanitationReference
Regulation for Peace and Good Order 1919 • Rules for the Township of DSM
• Township ordinance of 1920 
• Sanitation management
• Suppression of mosquitoes, dealing with sanitary nuisance and insanitary premises 
• Provision of sanitation and water services were segregative and services concentrated in areas resided by European Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  
Township Ordinance of 1920 • Township (Building) rules • Settlement planning had to adhere to sanitation rules
• Provision of building permits 
• Building permit provided based on residential zones.
• In Zone III where native buildings were erected, any building could be built 
Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  
• Township Rules of 1923 • To combine the following rule:
• Rule for Township of DSM 1919
• Sanitary Rules for DSM aimed at suppression of mosquitoes, sanitary nuisance, and insanitary premises
• Township (Building) Rule aimed at provision of permits for erecting buildings
• The combination could make rule for Health, Order, and good governance of the Township 
• Provision of sanitation and water services was segregative based on racial and services concentrated in areas set aside for European compared to Natives. Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  
Type of legislationRules made under the respective ordinancePurposeNature of service provision and impact on sanitationReference
Regulation for Peace and Good Order 1919 • Rules for the Township of DSM
• Township ordinance of 1920 
• Sanitation management
• Suppression of mosquitoes, dealing with sanitary nuisance and insanitary premises 
• Provision of sanitation and water services were segregative and services concentrated in areas resided by European Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  
Township Ordinance of 1920 • Township (Building) rules • Settlement planning had to adhere to sanitation rules
• Provision of building permits 
• Building permit provided based on residential zones.
• In Zone III where native buildings were erected, any building could be built 
Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  
• Township Rules of 1923 • To combine the following rule:
• Rule for Township of DSM 1919
• Sanitary Rules for DSM aimed at suppression of mosquitoes, sanitary nuisance, and insanitary premises
• Township (Building) Rule aimed at provision of permits for erecting buildings
• The combination could make rule for Health, Order, and good governance of the Township 
• Provision of sanitation and water services was segregative based on racial and services concentrated in areas set aside for European compared to Natives. Kironde (1994), Emig (2010)  

Source:Kironde (1994) and URT (2013).

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