Trinidad has suffered from the classic water problems that face developing countries such as unreliability and low pressure. These problems stem from policies relating to the supply and distribution system, economic and management approaches, and in general, the country's politics and corruption. Ultimately consumers have been plagued by persistent water woes to the extent that they have resisted increased water rates. The aim of this article is to diagnose policy failures that hampered water provision from the mid-1980s to mid-1990s.