Corn or maize (Zea mays L.) is the most significant grain crop worldwide after wheat and rice. It is widely cultivated and consumed as food, feed, and industrial raw material, along with the emission of a large quantity of corn waste. Such abundant, renewable, and cheap wastes with unique chemical compositions can be efficiently converted into adsorbents for the elimination of dye-contaminated water. This article represents an extensive review of the use of corn/maize waste-derived adsorbents for the sequestration of dyes from aqueous media. This study addressed the utilization of corn residues, including cob, stalk, straw, husk, and silk, as precursors for adsorbents. The adsorption behaviour, mechanism, and regeneration of the studied corn adsorbent/dye systems were identified. It was observed that the most common forms of corn/maize-derived adsorbents that have been utilized for the sequestration of dyes include biosorbents, biochars, activated carbons, and composites. The highest adsorption capacity (1,682.7 mg/g) for dye (methylene blue) sequestration was obtained using a corn husk composite-based adsorbent. Important findings and future ideas are finally mentioned for the corn/maize-based materials and their application as adsorbents for dye removal.

  • Use of corn adsorbents strengthens the popular waste-to-wealth management strategy.

  • The adsorbent groups include biosorbents, activated carbons, biochar, and composites.

  • Major mechanisms are electrostatic attraction, ion exchange, and hydrogen bonding.

  • The adsorbents can be recycled and reused several times.

  • The highest adsorption capacity (1,682.7 mg/g) was obtained using a corn husk-based composite.

The discharge of contaminants from agricultural, industrial, and municipal activities has a significant impact on public health and aquatic environments (Iwuozor et al. 2022a; Omuku et al. 2022). These contaminants include substances such as dyes, heavy metals, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and phenolic compounds, among others (Zhul-quarnain et al. 2018; Adeniyi et al. 2022). Dyes are widely used in various industries such as textiles, leather, paper, and food, and their use has led to the release of substantial amounts of dye-containing wastewater into the environment (Abubakar & Batagarawa 2017; Abdullah et al. 2019). Dye contamination in the environment has become a significant environmental issue due to its toxicity, carcinogenicity, and mutagenicity (Yaneva & Georgieva 2013). These contaminants can have harmful impacts on the ecosystem, aquatic life, and human health. Dye contamination in the environment can affect water quality, leading to a decrease in oxygen levels and the accumulation of toxic substances that can result in the death of aquatic life (Abubakar & Batagarawa 2017; Ranjbar et al. 2022). Dye-contaminated water can also affect soil quality, leading to soil degradation, reduced crop productivity, and environmental pollution (Abdel-Aal et al. 2006; Zolgharnein et al. 2016; Ali et al. 2017). Conventional treatment methods for removing dyes from wastewater, such as physical, chemical, and biological techniques, have limitations and can be expensive. As a result, researchers have turned to alternative, cost-effective, and eco-friendly methods for the removal of dyes from aqueous media. Numerous methods have been developed to remove dyes from wastewater, such as adsorption, coagulation, and advanced oxidation processes (Balathanigaimani et al. 2009; Chen et al. 2011, 2020; Chang et al. 2021). Among these methods, adsorption has gained considerable attention as a simple, cost-effective, and efficient process (Abubakar & Batagarawa 2017; Ali et al. 2017). The use of adsorbents derived from natural materials, such as maize/corn-based adsorbents, has emerged as a promising approach for dye removal due to their abundance, low cost, and eco-friendly nature.

Corn or maize is a widely cultivated crop, and its by-products, including husks, cobs, stalks, and leaves, generate significant waste (Mu et al. 2020). These wastes are often left in the field, which can result in environmental issues such as soil degradation and pollution of water resources. In addition, the burning of corn waste in some regions can lead to air pollution and contribute to greenhouse gas emissions (Zheng et al. 2010; Zhao et al. 2014). In recent years, there has been a growing interest in utilizing corn waste as a sustainable and cost-effective solution to address these environmental issues. One promising approach is to convert corn waste into valuable products such as biofuels, biogas, and biodegradable plastics (Kamusoko et al. 2021). For instance, the fermentation of corn waste can produce biogas, which can be used as a renewable energy source for electricity generation and heating. Maize/corn-based adsorbents have recently emerged as a promising alternative for the sequestration of dyes from aqueous media due to their abundance, low cost, renewability, and biodegradability (Rehl et al. 2012). These adsorbents have shown high adsorption capacities for various types of dyes, including synthetic and natural dyes, and have the potential to be used in large-scale wastewater treatment systems.

From the literature survey, it was found that there are a number of review articles that studied the application of corn/maize-based adsorbents for the treatment of water, but none of them were specific on the utilization of the adsorbents for the removal of dyes from aqueous media. For instance, the application of corn cob-based adsorbents for the treatment of heavy metals and dyes has been reviewed (Arquilada et al. 2018). Another study discussed the adsorption of specific aquatic pollutants, with a focus on heavy metals, by corn waste-based adsorbents (Sharma et al. 2019). Also, the pesticide adsorption on biochar derived from maize, rice, and wheat residues has been studied (Ogura et al. 2021). However, these reviews were specific and did not address the synthesis, properties, performance, and reusability of corn/maize-based adsorbents for dye sequestration in detail. This critical review aims to analyse the existing literature on the use of maize/corn-based adsorbents for the sequestration of dyes from aqueous media. This discusses the key aspects of adsorption processes, including adsorption mechanisms, adsorbent preparation, and the effect of various parameters such as pH, temperature, and contact time on the adsorption capacity. Furthermore, regeneration and reusability studies and competitive adsorption were discussed. Moreover, this review will also highlight the challenges and limitations of maize/corn-based adsorbents and identify future research directions to improve their efficiency. The review is restricted to only articles published in the literature in the past 10 years, and only articles published in English were considered.

Owing to maize/corn's adequate obtainability and accessibility across many continents, their adsorbents have been researched for the elimination of umpteen pollutants from various aquatic environments. Furthermore, it is also worth noting that different maize organs are always disposed of as solid agro-waste, and thus, this has fuelled the attention of researchers in converting this type of agro-waste to an estimable value-added adsorbent, as this is seen as a way of strengthening from waste to wealth-health sustainability in general. For simplicity and lucidity, the discourse in the succeeding subheadings is structured with respect to the adsorbents' extensive classifications, viz., unmodified maize (UM), maize activated carbon (MAC), maize biochar (MBC), and maize composite (MC) adsorbent, as depicted in Figure 1.
Figure 1

Classification of maize-based adsorbents.

Figure 1

Classification of maize-based adsorbents.

Close modal

UM adsorbent/maize biosorbent

UM adsorbents are usually prepared by washing the as-collected maize matrix with H2O to remove dirt, followed by drying under the shade, in sunlight, in an oven, or air-drying to remove or reduce its moisture and proliferate the active site's numerical strength for the adsorption process (Ponce et al. 2021). According to Petrović et al. (2017), the as-collected corn silk matrix obtained from planted corn was dried at 353 K, pulverized, and sieved to obtain <0.2 mm particle size. This preparation process was similar to the one carried out by Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017), Lima et al. (2018), Paşka et al. (2014), and Fadhil & Eisa (2019). However, Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017) sun dried their own maize organ (stalk) before oven drying at 65 °C for 24 h and then pounding and sieving to a mesh size of 106 μm, and this was somewhat similar to the water boiling of the plant matrix carried out by Dehvari et al. (2013) and Değermenci et al. (2019) before oven drying at 100 oC and 60 °C, respectively. The authors emphasized that the essence of boiling the plant samples mildly before proper drying is to improve adsorption. Conversely, Guyo et al. (2015) and Ibrahim (2013) air dried as-collected maize plant part samples after washing before pulverizing to the required size. Then, the maize plant sample needed to be cleansed using deionized water, dried once more to get rid of some impurities on its surface, and then sieved to obtain a smooth biosorbent with better porosity (Petrović et al. 2017).

Maize-based biochar

Biochar is a permeable pyrogenic carbonaceous material fabricated by thermal putrefaction of agricultural wastes such as maize cob, livestock mucks, and other biomass in an infinitesimal O2 supply condition without any kind of chemical or physicochemical activation (Liu et al. 2018a; Billa et al. 2019; Eltaweil et al. 2020; Iwuozor et al. 2022b). According to Eltaweil et al. (2020), Iwuozor et al. (2022b), Yang et al. (2018), Wan et al. (2018), and Maneechakr & Karnjanakom (2019), this type of adsorbent fabrication approach is a revolutionary methodology that does not only help in reducing global warming that accompany the emission of CO2 during open burning of biomass or biomass wastes but also afford the resulting adsorbent with excellent porous architecture, enhanced immunity to corrosion and degradation, availability of significant oxygen-containing organic architectural functional groups, and inexpensive fabrication budget, all of which render biochar as an eco-benign sorption candidate for the elimination or degradation of dye contaminants.

Accordingly, MBC is the product of maize matrix anoxic pyrolysis. From various reports gathered in Table 1, most of the authors (Ma et al. 2016; Gao et al. 2019; Tsamo et al. 2019; Li et al. 2019a, 2019b; Eltaweil et al. 2020; Mu et al. 2020; Zhang et al. 2020; Gao et al. 2021) prepared the MBC in a pyrolyzer/muffle furnace sustained between 300–800 oC for 120–360 min with a heating rate of 5–20 oC/min. In addition to the aforementioned harsh reactor condition, nitrogen gas is sometimes added to the biomass matrix in an effort to forefend ash formation as well as to maintain the inert environment in the pyrolyzer, owing to the fact that it has been experimentally established that the biochar yield and the explicit surface area profile are reliant on the aforementioned pyrolysis operating parameters (Gao et al. 2019; Ahmad et al. 2020; Zhang et al. 2020; Gao et al. 2021; Iwuozor et al. 2022b).

Table 1

Summary of methodology for preparation of maize/corn adsorbents

Plant partsAdsorbent classModification/activation
Carbonization
CharacterizationBET SSA (m2/g)Yield (wt %)References
Reagent/materialProcessTemp (°C)Heating rate (°C/min)Time (mins)
Cob MAC KOH Base activation 800 – 1,440 FT-IR-ATR, SEM, XRD – – Abdullah et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Graphene oxide  60 – 120 FT-IR, SEM – – Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MB – – 60 – – – – – Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 600 – 60 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 600 – 60 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC H2SO4 Acid activation 50 10 120 FT-IR, SEM – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 5,000 – 60 FT-IR, SEM – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MB HCl Pyrolysis + Acid activation 350 – 180 FT-IR, SEM, BET – – Assirey & Altamimi (2021)  
Cob MB HCl Pyrolysis + Acid activation 450 – 180 FT-IR, SEM, BET 407 – Assirey & Altamimi (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 500 0.2 60 FT-IR-ATR – – Campos et al. (2020)  
Stover MAC Ethanol-ammonia + aminopropyltriethoxysilane – 70 – 960 FT-IR, XRD SEM-EDS, BET 0.693  Carijo et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Epichlorohydroin and N,N-dimethylformamide and trimethylamine – 100 – 1,440 – – – Chen et al. (2012)  
Straw pith MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation – – – SEM, FT-IR, XRD – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC KOH and NaOH Pyrolysis + base activation 500 10 60 SEM, TEM, BET 1,993 – Chen et al. (2019)  
Stem MAC H3PO4, KOH, and ZnCl Pyrolysis + acid, base and salt activation – – – – – 25.8 Dada et al. (2012)  
Starch MAC Hydrogen peroxide Acid activation 80 – 60 SEM, FT-IR, XRD – – Dai et al. (2017)  
Silk MB – – 60 – 4,320 SEM, FT-IR – – Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Tassel powder MAC – – 102 – 144 UV-visible spectrophotometer – – Dehvari et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 500 – 60 BET, XRD, SEM, EDX, FT-IR 0.431 – Dina et al. (2012)  
Seed chaff MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Stalk MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Cob MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Husk MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX– – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Husk MAC Tartaric acid Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Husk MAC Metanoic acid Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF, FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Husk MAC Phenol Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF, FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC NaOH Pyrolysis + base activation 500 – 120 XRD, Raman, FT-IR, TEM, EDS, XPS – – Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Cob MAC AlCl3 Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 120 SEM, BET 146.64  El-Bendary et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 120 SEM. BET 118.53  El-Bendary et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 400 – 120 BET 700  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 500 – 120 BET 633  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 600 – 120 BET 600  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Straw MBC FeCl3.CH2Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 180 XRD, FT-IR, TEM-EDS, VSM, XPS, TGA, BET 80.1 – Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Leaves MAC HCl Acid activation – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC – – 70 – 1,440 SEM – – Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Cob MB – Pyrolysis 500 – 120 FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 120 FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC – – 25 – 1,440 SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Fathi et al. (2015)  
Cob MB – – – – – – – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Straw MBC – Pyrolysis 300 10 120 SEM, BET FT-IR 1.19 – Gao et al. (2019)  
Straw MBC – Pyrolysis 800 10 120 SEM, BET FT-IR 74.33 – Gao et al. (2019)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC – Pyrolysis 700 10 120 SEM, EDX, XRD, BET, XPS 20.34 – Gao et al. (2021)  
Hull MAC Tartaric acid Acid activation – – – – – – Ghasemi et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC Succinic anhydride and xylene Acid activation – – – FT-IR,SEM-EDX – – Guo et al. (2015a)  
Starch MB – – – – – SEM, BET, BJH, pore size analyser – – Guo et al. (2015b)  
Porous starch MAC Sodium dihydrogen phosphate-citric acid buffer Acid activation – – – SEM, BET, BJH, pore size analyser – – Guo et al. (2015b)  
Straw MAC Zinc acetate Salt activation – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Zinc acetate and manganese acetate Salt activation – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MB – – – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Stover MB – – – – – – – – Guyo et al. (2015)  
Stover MAC HNO3 Acid activation – – – – – – Guyo et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Ibrahim (2013)  
Stalk MAC HCl Acid activation – – – – – – Ismail et al. (2019)  
Husk leaf MAC Ca(OH)2 Salt activation 550 – – FT-IR, FE-SEM, XRF – – Jalil et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC – – 100 – 1,200 FT-IR, SEM – – Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H2SO4 Acid activation 105 – 1,440 FT-IR, SEM, XRD, BET, CHNS-O – – Jawad et al. (2018)  
Straw MB – – – – – BET, SEM, FT-IR 21.0 – Jia & Li (2015)  
Pith MAC H2SO4 Acid activation – – – BET, FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD 0.01 – Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 180 SEM, FT-IR, BET 1,187.00  Kang et al. (2018)  
Husk MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 100 – 1,440 – – – Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Stalk MAC – – – – – XRD, SEM-EDS, BET 4.79 – Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 350 – 120 – – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Stalk MBC Urea & NaHCO3 Base activation + pyrolysis 700 10 120 BET, XRD, XPS 325.90 – Li et al. (2019a)  
Stalk MAC Ethyl acetate Base activation – – – SEM, BET 201.0 – Li et al. (2019b)  
Straw MB – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET 0.85 – Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MB – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET 0.85 – Lima et al. (2018)  
Bract MAC 2-Aminothiazole Base activation – – – FT-IR, SEM, XPS – – Lin et al. (2018)  
Husk leaves MAC N,N-dimethylformamide and chloroacetyl chloride – 100 – 720 FT-IR, XPS – – Lin et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC – – 500 – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC KOH Base activation – – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC KOH Base activation + pyrolysis 800 10 60 SEM, BET, Raman, FT-IR, XPS 1,054.20 – Liu et al. (2020a)  
Stalk MAC Citric acid Acid activation – – – FT-IR, BET 45.30 – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Pericarp MAC KOH Base activation + pyrolysis 627 93 BET, SEM, EDS 23.31 – Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC – Pyrolysis 300 20 360 SEM, EDS, XPS, FT-IR – – Ma et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR, FE-SEM – – Ma et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC KOH Base activation + Pyrolysis 800 60 FT-IR, EDS, XPS, BET 213.18 – Ma et al. (2019)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Maghri et al. (2012)  
Husk MB – – 105 – 1,440 – – – Malik et al. (2016)  
Fibre MAC Isopropyl alcohol – – – – EDS, SEM, FT-IR – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC CaCl2 Base activation – – – SEM, EDX – – Manzoor et al. (2019)  
Stigmata MB – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Silk MB – – 100 – 360 SEM, FT-IR – – Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC – – 300 – 120 SEM, EDS, FT-IR – – Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 900 – 180 FT-IR, Raman, XRD, SEM – – Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 240 SEM, FT-IR, BET – – Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 30 SEM, FT-IR – – Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Tassel MAC H2SO4 Acid activation – – – XRD, FT-IR 250.0 – Moyo et al. (2013)  
Cob MB – – – – – – – – Ibrahim (2013)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Cob MB – – 100 – 1,440 SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Muthusamy & Murugan (2016)  
Silk MC – – – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 500 20 120 SEM, TEM, XRD, VSM – – Nethaji et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 105 – 300 SEM, FT-IR – – Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 105 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 and ZnCl2 Acid Pyrolysis + pyrolysis + salt activation 500 – 60 – 1,195.12 – Okafor et al. (2015)  
Tassel MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 60 FT-IR, SEM – – Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Cob MC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Husk MB – – – – – FT-IR, – – Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MC – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Guin et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Malic acid Acid activation – – – SEM, EDS, XRD, FT-IR, XPS – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Silk MB – – – – – SEM-EDX, ATR-FT-IR, BET 1.36 – Petrović et al. (2016)  
Silk MB – – – – – SEM-EDX, ATR-FT-IR 1.36 – Petrović et al. (2017)  
Husk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – SEM, ATR-FT-IR, BET, XRD 3.01 – Ponce et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 110 – 1,440 XRD, XPS, UV-DRS, PL, FT-IR, FE-SEM, BET, TEM 293.12 – Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 900 – 360 BET, TPD, TGA – – Reddy et al. (2016)  
Straw MAC Zncl2 Salt activation – – – SEM, BET 937.0  Ren et al. (2020)  
Pericarp MB – – – – – SEM, ATR-FT-IR, BET 1.53 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM – – Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MB – – – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM – – Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Cob MB – – 120 – 1,440 – – – Sallau et al. (2012)  
Cob MB – – – – – XRD, TDS, TSS – – Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob leaves MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Stalk MAC Cetylpyridinium bromide Salt activation – – – FT-IR 42.6 – Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Cob MC – – – – – XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, BET, VSM, XPS 23.10 – Song et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Sulphuric acid Acid activation 150 – 1,440 – – – Ismail et al. (2018)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Sulphuric acid Acid activation – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Magnetic particles FeSO4.7H2O and FeCl3.6H2– – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Tan et al. (2012)  
Stalk MAC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – XPS, FT-IR – – Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Maleic anhydride Acid activation – – – XPS, FT-IR – – Tang et al. (2021)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Tejada-Tovar et al. (2021)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 400 – 20 – – – Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide Salt activation – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM 4.21 – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Cob MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR – – Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Stem tissue MB – – – – – BET, FT-IR, SEM 7.23 – Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC HCl Acid activation + pyrolysis 700 – 60 FT-IR, SEM, BET 784.76 56.60 Wang et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC C17H38NBr Salt activation – – – – – – Umpuch (2015)  
Stalk MAC Triethylenetetramine – – – – SEM, TEM – – Wang et al. (2016)  
Leaf MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Tassel MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Root MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Silk MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Ear MBC – pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Polyarcrylic acid Acid activation – – – FE-SEM, FT-IR – – Wen et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC KOH Pyrolysis and base activation 500 10.0 60 SEM, FT-IR, EDS, BET, thermal analyser 591.0 – Wu et al. (2013)  
Stalk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR, XRD, TG, SEM – – Wu et al. (2017)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – FT-IR, BET 809.80 – Zhang et al. (2014)  
Stover MAC ZrO2 – – – – BET 2.63 – Zhang et al. (2016)
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 600 15 120 SEM, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, EPR 468.59 28.34 Zhang et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Glutamic acid Acid activation – – – SEM, FT-IR – – Zhao et al. (2014)  
Cover MC – – – – – XRD, EDX, SEM, FT-IR – – Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classModification/activation
Carbonization
CharacterizationBET SSA (m2/g)Yield (wt %)References
Reagent/materialProcessTemp (°C)Heating rate (°C/min)Time (mins)
Cob MAC KOH Base activation 800 – 1,440 FT-IR-ATR, SEM, XRD – – Abdullah et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Graphene oxide  60 – 120 FT-IR, SEM – – Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MB – – 60 – – – – – Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 600 – 60 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 600 – 60 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC H2SO4 Acid activation 50 10 120 FT-IR, SEM – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 5,000 – 60 FT-IR, SEM – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MB HCl Pyrolysis + Acid activation 350 – 180 FT-IR, SEM, BET – – Assirey & Altamimi (2021)  
Cob MB HCl Pyrolysis + Acid activation 450 – 180 FT-IR, SEM, BET 407 – Assirey & Altamimi (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 500 0.2 60 FT-IR-ATR – – Campos et al. (2020)  
Stover MAC Ethanol-ammonia + aminopropyltriethoxysilane – 70 – 960 FT-IR, XRD SEM-EDS, BET 0.693  Carijo et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Epichlorohydroin and N,N-dimethylformamide and trimethylamine – 100 – 1,440 – – – Chen et al. (2012)  
Straw pith MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation – – – SEM, FT-IR, XRD – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC KOH and NaOH Pyrolysis + base activation 500 10 60 SEM, TEM, BET 1,993 – Chen et al. (2019)  
Stem MAC H3PO4, KOH, and ZnCl Pyrolysis + acid, base and salt activation – – – – – 25.8 Dada et al. (2012)  
Starch MAC Hydrogen peroxide Acid activation 80 – 60 SEM, FT-IR, XRD – – Dai et al. (2017)  
Silk MB – – 60 – 4,320 SEM, FT-IR – – Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Tassel powder MAC – – 102 – 144 UV-visible spectrophotometer – – Dehvari et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 500 – 60 BET, XRD, SEM, EDX, FT-IR 0.431 – Dina et al. (2012)  
Seed chaff MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Stalk MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Cob MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Husk MB – – 100 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX– – – Duru & Duru (2017)  
Husk MAC Tartaric acid Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Husk MAC Metanoic acid Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF, FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Husk MAC Phenol Pyrolysis + acid activation 100 – 240 EDXRF, FT-IR – – Duru et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC NaOH Pyrolysis + base activation 500 – 120 XRD, Raman, FT-IR, TEM, EDS, XPS – – Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Cob MAC AlCl3 Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 120 SEM, BET 146.64  El-Bendary et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 120 SEM. BET 118.53  El-Bendary et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 400 – 120 BET 700  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 500 – 120 BET 633  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation + pyrolysis 600 – 120 BET 600  El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Straw MBC FeCl3.CH2Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 180 XRD, FT-IR, TEM-EDS, VSM, XPS, TGA, BET 80.1 – Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Leaves MAC HCl Acid activation – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC – – 70 – 1,440 SEM – – Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Cob MB – Pyrolysis 500 – 120 FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Pyrolysis + acid activation 500 – 120 FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC – – 25 – 1,440 SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Fathi et al. (2015)  
Cob MB – – – – – – – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Straw MBC – Pyrolysis 300 10 120 SEM, BET FT-IR 1.19 – Gao et al. (2019)  
Straw MBC – Pyrolysis 800 10 120 SEM, BET FT-IR 74.33 – Gao et al. (2019)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC – Pyrolysis 700 10 120 SEM, EDX, XRD, BET, XPS 20.34 – Gao et al. (2021)  
Hull MAC Tartaric acid Acid activation – – – – – – Ghasemi et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC Succinic anhydride and xylene Acid activation – – – FT-IR,SEM-EDX – – Guo et al. (2015a)  
Starch MB – – – – – SEM, BET, BJH, pore size analyser – – Guo et al. (2015b)  
Porous starch MAC Sodium dihydrogen phosphate-citric acid buffer Acid activation – – – SEM, BET, BJH, pore size analyser – – Guo et al. (2015b)  
Straw MAC Zinc acetate Salt activation – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Zinc acetate and manganese acetate Salt activation – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MB – – – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Guo et al. (2018)  
Stover MB – – – – – – – – Guyo et al. (2015)  
Stover MAC HNO3 Acid activation – – – – – – Guyo et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Ibrahim (2013)  
Stalk MAC HCl Acid activation – – – – – – Ismail et al. (2019)  
Husk leaf MAC Ca(OH)2 Salt activation 550 – – FT-IR, FE-SEM, XRF – – Jalil et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC – – 100 – 1,200 FT-IR, SEM – – Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H2SO4 Acid activation 105 – 1,440 FT-IR, SEM, XRD, BET, CHNS-O – – Jawad et al. (2018)  
Straw MB – – – – – BET, SEM, FT-IR 21.0 – Jia & Li (2015)  
Pith MAC H2SO4 Acid activation – – – BET, FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD 0.01 – Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 180 SEM, FT-IR, BET 1,187.00  Kang et al. (2018)  
Husk MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 100 – 1,440 – – – Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Stalk MAC – – – – – XRD, SEM-EDS, BET 4.79 – Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC ZnCl2 Salt activation 350 – 120 – – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Stalk MBC Urea & NaHCO3 Base activation + pyrolysis 700 10 120 BET, XRD, XPS 325.90 – Li et al. (2019a)  
Stalk MAC Ethyl acetate Base activation – – – SEM, BET 201.0 – Li et al. (2019b)  
Straw MB – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET 0.85 – Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MB – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET 0.85 – Lima et al. (2018)  
Bract MAC 2-Aminothiazole Base activation – – – FT-IR, SEM, XPS – – Lin et al. (2018)  
Husk leaves MAC N,N-dimethylformamide and chloroacetyl chloride – 100 – 720 FT-IR, XPS – – Lin et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC – – 500 – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC KOH Base activation – – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – Pore analyser, FT-IR, SEM, XRD – – Liu et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC KOH Base activation + pyrolysis 800 10 60 SEM, BET, Raman, FT-IR, XPS 1,054.20 – Liu et al. (2020a)  
Stalk MAC Citric acid Acid activation – – – FT-IR, BET 45.30 – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Pericarp MAC KOH Base activation + pyrolysis 627 93 BET, SEM, EDS 23.31 – Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Stalk MBC – Pyrolysis 300 20 360 SEM, EDS, XPS, FT-IR – – Ma et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR, FE-SEM – – Ma et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC KOH Base activation + Pyrolysis 800 60 FT-IR, EDS, XPS, BET 213.18 – Ma et al. (2019)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Maghri et al. (2012)  
Husk MB – – 105 – 1,440 – – – Malik et al. (2016)  
Fibre MAC Isopropyl alcohol – – – – EDS, SEM, FT-IR – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC CaCl2 Base activation – – – SEM, EDX – – Manzoor et al. (2019)  
Stigmata MB – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Silk MB – – 100 – 360 SEM, FT-IR – – Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC – – 300 – 120 SEM, EDS, FT-IR – – Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 900 – 180 FT-IR, Raman, XRD, SEM – – Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 240 SEM, FT-IR, BET – – Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 30 SEM, FT-IR – – Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Tassel MAC H2SO4 Acid activation – – – XRD, FT-IR 250.0 – Moyo et al. (2013)  
Cob MB – – – – – – – – Ibrahim (2013)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Cob MB – – 100 – 1,440 SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Muthusamy & Murugan (2016)  
Silk MC – – – – – SEM, XRD, FT-IR – – Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 500 20 120 SEM, TEM, XRD, VSM – – Nethaji et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 105 – 300 SEM, FT-IR – – Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 105 – 300 FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 and ZnCl2 Acid Pyrolysis + pyrolysis + salt activation 500 – 60 – 1,195.12 – Okafor et al. (2015)  
Tassel MAC – Pyrolysis 500 – 60 FT-IR, SEM – – Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Cob MC – – – – – FT-IR, SEM, EDX – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Husk MB – – – – – FT-IR, – – Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MC – – – – – FT-IR, XRD, SEM – – Guin et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Malic acid Acid activation – – – SEM, EDS, XRD, FT-IR, XPS – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Silk MB – – – – – SEM-EDX, ATR-FT-IR, BET 1.36 – Petrović et al. (2016)  
Silk MB – – – – – SEM-EDX, ATR-FT-IR 1.36 – Petrović et al. (2017)  
Husk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – SEM, ATR-FT-IR, BET, XRD 3.01 – Ponce et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation 110 – 1,440 XRD, XPS, UV-DRS, PL, FT-IR, FE-SEM, BET, TEM 293.12 – Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC – Pyrolysis 900 – 360 BET, TPD, TGA – – Reddy et al. (2016)  
Straw MAC Zncl2 Salt activation – – – SEM, BET 937.0  Ren et al. (2020)  
Pericarp MB – – – – – SEM, ATR-FT-IR, BET 1.53 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM – – Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MB – – – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM – – Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Cob MB – – 120 – 1,440 – – – Sallau et al. (2012)  
Cob MB – – – – – XRD, TDS, TSS – – Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob leaves MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Stalk MAC Cetylpyridinium bromide Salt activation – – – FT-IR 42.6 – Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Cob MC – – – – – XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, BET, VSM, XPS 23.10 – Song et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Sulphuric acid Acid activation 150 – 1,440 – – – Ismail et al. (2018)  
Stalk MB – – – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Sulphuric acid Acid activation – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Magnetic particles FeSO4.7H2O and FeCl3.6H2– – – – – – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC – – – – – – – – Tan et al. (2012)  
Stalk MAC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – XPS, FT-IR – – Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Maleic anhydride Acid activation – – – XPS, FT-IR – – Tang et al. (2021)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR, SEM – – Tejada-Tovar et al. (2021)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 400 – 20 – – – Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide Salt activation – – – FT-IR, BET, SEM 4.21 – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Cob MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR – – Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Stem tissue MB – – – – – BET, FT-IR, SEM 7.23 – Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC HCl Acid activation + pyrolysis 700 – 60 FT-IR, SEM, BET 784.76 56.60 Wang et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC C17H38NBr Salt activation – – – – – – Umpuch (2015)  
Stalk MAC Triethylenetetramine – – – – SEM, TEM – – Wang et al. (2016)  
Leaf MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Tassel MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Root MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Silk MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Ear MBC – pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 500 5.0 360 BET 2.72 – Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Polyarcrylic acid Acid activation – – – FE-SEM, FT-IR – – Wen et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC KOH Pyrolysis and base activation 500 10.0 60 SEM, FT-IR, EDS, BET, thermal analyser 591.0 – Wu et al. (2013)  
Stalk MAC NaOH Base activation – – – FT-IR, XRD, TG, SEM – – Wu et al. (2017)  
Cob MB – – – – – FT-IR – – Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MAC H3PO4 Acid activation – – – FT-IR, BET 809.80 – Zhang et al. (2014)  
Stover MAC ZrO2 – – – – BET 2.63 – Zhang et al. (2016)
Cob MBC – Pyrolysis 600 15 120 SEM, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, EPR 468.59 28.34 Zhang et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Glutamic acid Acid activation – – – SEM, FT-IR – – Zhao et al. (2014)  
Cover MC – – – – – XRD, EDX, SEM, FT-IR – – Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  

ATR (Attenuated total reflection), BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller), BJH (Barrett–Joyner–Halenda), UV-DRS (Ultraviolet–Visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy), EDS or EDX (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), EDXRF (Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence), EPR (Electron paramagnetic resonance), FT-IR-ATR (Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated total reflection), PL (Photoluminescence emission spectra), PSO (Pseudo-second order), RE (Removal efficiency), SSA (specific surface area), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, TDS (Total Dissolved Solids), TEM (Transmission electron microscopy), TG or TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis), TPD (Temperature programmed decomposition), TSS (Total Suspended Solids), VSM (vibrating sample magnetometer), XRD (X-ray Diffraction), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), XRF (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy).

For instance, to prepare corn cob biochar, Zhang et al. (2020) first washed the collected cob with water and absolute EtOH. The biomass was then dried for 24 h in a vacuum chamber at 90°C, followed by pulverizing and sieving to create fine char. The cob fine char was added to a corundum crucible, pyrolyzed under a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 h at a constant temperature of 600 °C (15 °C/min), and then chilled to ambient temperature while maintaining a nitrogen condition. The finished char was then grounded, neutralized with water and EtOH, and dried for 12 h at 90 °C. This similar method was adopted for the fabrication of nZVI/corn straw and functional corn straw biochar composites by Eltaweil et al. (2020) and Gao et al. (2021). Although, according to Eltaweil et al. (2020), the nZVI/corn straw composite was fabricated via a reduction process after the corn straw biochar had been successfully achieved, Gao et al. (2021) achieved the biochar composite in a single pyrolysis step. Shortly, as reported by Eltaweil et al. (2020), ethanol–water (EtOH-H2O) (8:2 ml) was mixed with 50 mg of corn straw biochar and 180 mg of FeCl3.6H2O, and then the mixture was sonicated for 30 min. To convert Fe3+ ions into Fe0, freshly made aqueous NaBH4 was added in drops to the Fe3+/corn straw composite blends. Following the complete addition of NaBH4, the magnetic nZVI/corn straw composite that emerged was detached with an external magnet, repeatedly rinsed with water and EtOH, and then dried overnight in an oven at 50 °C.

Maize activated carbon

MAC can be prepared by chemically activating UM or further activating the MBC analogue, as it has been established in a cow dung-based adsorbent review performed by Iwuozor et al. (2022b) that activation of biochar and its advanced treatment are essential for better adsorptive achievement. Empirically speaking, the MAC and MBC have parallel functional features except for a minor architectural disparity that is primarily linked to permeability. It is assumed that advanced activation of MBC enriches the biochar functional groups and also improves its porosity, which in turn affords extra binding sites for pollutant elimination as a result of increased surface area (Dehkhoda et al. 2016; Tan et al. 2017; Liu et al. 2018a; Li et al. 2019a). Holistically, according to literature, there are two distinct practices (physical and chemical) for producing MAC (Jun et al. 2010; Al-Swaidan & Ahmad 2011; Danish et al. 2011; Ekpete & Horsfall 2011; Yahya et al. 2015). In physical treatment, the matrix will first undergo carbonization and then be activated with steam or CO2. Contrarily, in chemical treatment, the matrix is impregnated with an activating reagent and then carbonizes (pyrolytic decomposition of the biomass matrix) in a hypoxic atmosphere afterward (Solar et al. 2008; Yagmur et al. 2008; Giraldo & Moreno-Piraján 2012; Vicinisvarri et al. 2014). Notably, from several reports gathered in Table 1, during the preparation, most authors used a pre-carbonization activation tactic where the maize plant matrix was chemically activated using acid, base, or salt prior to actual carbonization. Meanwhile, the author provided no pragmatic explanation for the pre-carbonization activation practice selection. Nevertheless, it might be because pre-carbonization activation practice requires lower temperatures, gives a higher yield, produces a high surface area, requires a single step, creates fully grown micro-porousness, and reduces inorganic material composition, as expounded in some other reports (Budinova et al. 2006; Zhu et al. 2008; Hirunpraditkoon et al. 2011; Cruz et al. 2012; Yahya et al. 2015). Going forward, on a general note, the standard procedure before activation includes drying, pulverizing, and sieving to the desired particle size of the as-collected maize precursor. Furthermore, as shown in Table 1, most authors used H3PO4 for acid activation, KOH for base activation, and ZnCl2 for salt activation. Basically, the role of the activating reagent is to function as a dehydrator and oxidant, avert the materialization of the ash or tar, and dissolve the cellulosic constituents of the matrix while introducing the interfacial organic oxygen moiety to the carbon of the matrix, stimulating the development of cross-links and carbon yield (Noor & Nawi 2008; Wang et al. 2010; Bello & Ahmad 2011; Campbell et al. 2012; Jassim et al. 2012; Mahapatra et al. 2012; Örkün et al. 2012; Yahya et al. 2015).

Ali et al. (2017), Zhang et al. (2014), and Aljeboree et al. (2019) used phosphoric acid as an activating agent, while Loya-González et al. (2019) and Liu et al. (2020a) used KOH as an activating agent. Briefly, during the chemical activation procedure, an amount of the activating reagent sufficient to create slurry was added to a weighed amount of the dried and size-reduced maize matrix. The slurry was agitated for a few seconds (usually >60 s) and then left to stand still for some time (usually a few hours). After that, the mixture's filtration residue is used to extract the activated maize matrix, which is then dried in an oven for some hours. To create the preferred MAC, the saturated and withered maize matrix was pyrolyzed in a furnace at various temperatures and times as reported in Table 1, followed by washing (usually with water) to obtain a benign sorbent product without impurity (Aljeboree et al. 2019; Loya-González et al. 2019; Campos et al. 2020). This MAC preparation methodology is consistent with the one adopted by Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019), Assirey & Altamimi (2021), Duru et al. (2019), Dutta & Nath (2018), and Peng et al. (2021) using H2SO4, HCl, tartaric acid, NaOH, and maleic acid, respectively.

Maize-based composite

Generally, the MC is functionalized collimate of MAC, MBC, or UM and is obtained through immobilization or impregnation of other materials such as graphene oxide (GO), nanoparticles such as TiO2, Fe3O4, nZVI, etc., onto the UM, MAC, or MBC to enhance their adsorption performance by improving the mechanical strength, ease of separation after usage, and recyclability, among others. According to several authors (Panneerselvam et al. 2011; Gong et al. 2012; Heidari & Razmi 2012; Wang et al. 2014; Zolgharnein et al. 2016), the new resulting adsorbent comes with the increased potential for pollutant removal because this immobilization of other materials with some proper biosorbents gives a synergetic blend of advantages for both the biosorbents and the material. For example, GO can confer the new sorbent with an increasingly large number of oxygen-containing groups, while NPs can confer better photodegradation (Qu et al. 2020; Emmanuel & Adesibikan 2021; Emmanuel et al. 2023a) and excellent stability (Emmanuel et al. 2023b). The composite can be fabricated generally in two ways: first, by preparing the maize adsorbent and the Nanoparticles (NP)/GO separately before blending them chemically, and second, by chemically blending the two materials at once. For instance, as reported by Qu et al. (2020), a corn cob biosorbent was first obtained by drying, pulverizing, sieving (60-mesh), and drying (at 60 oC) the virgin corn cob. Then GO was prepared as well by adding 1 g of graphene to 25 ml of concentrated H2SO4 for 60 sec, followed by the addition of 3.5 g of KMnO4 in a container. Consequently, after 480 min of ultrasonic stripping, 46 ml of deionization was gradually added to the container to terminate the reaction. This was followed by the addition of 140 ml of distilled H2O and 15 ml of 30% H2O2 to wash the product (GO) to neutrality, which was then dried at 60 °C. Subsequently, the GO/Corn Cob composites were fabricated by weighing 1.084 g of GO in 433.6 ml of deionized water. After the GO had fully dissolved, 17.344 g of corn cob biosorbent was slowly added and allowed to stand for 2 h, then later withered at 60 °C to achieve solid GO/Corn cob composites. This kind of two-step reaction approach was also used by Song et al. (2015) and Eltaweil et al. (2020) to prepare amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites and nZVI/corn straw biochar composite, respectively. However, Zolgharnein et al. (2016) differ in their own approach by adopting a single-step reaction for the fabrication of a nano-Fe3O4/corn cover composite. Briefly, the right quantity of Fe3O4 NP and corn cover were ground thoroughly, followed by the addition of distilled water and thorough mixing in a shaker at 300 rpm for 48 h, and then dried in an oven at 70 °C for 5 h. It is imperative to mention here that the effect of the material ratio was not established nor explained, and this is very relevant like other preparation operating parameters. However, a number of researches have been carried out to boost the performance of MAC and MBC, such as the identification of the influence of pyrogenic temperature on adsorbent yield and surface morphology (Campbell et al. 2012; El-Sayed et al. 2014; Gao et al. 2019), the influence of various chemical activating agents on the output and architectural features of MAC (Dada et al. 2012), and the impact of various activators and impregnation proportions on MAC performance (Abdullah et al. 2019). Also, a number of characterization techniques have been employed to evaluate the architectural properties and morphological features of maize-based adsorbents, and they are summarized in Figure 2 based on the information they can supply.
Figure 2

Common instrumental methods of analysis for studying the morphological and architectural properties of maize-based adsorbents.

Figure 2

Common instrumental methods of analysis for studying the morphological and architectural properties of maize-based adsorbents.

Close modal

An adsorbent's adsorptive ability is a crucial determinant of its application assessment. In Table 2, the ability of various corn-based adsorbents to remove contaminants from aqueous solutions is shown. The effectiveness of an adsorbent in removing a given pollutant is typically determined by two factors: adsorption capacity and removal efficiency. While pollutant removal efficiency depends on the pollutant concentration, adsorbent dosage, and competing ions in the system, adsorption capacity is an inherent property of an adsorbent towards the pollutant (Emenike et al. 2021, 2022a). The adsorption capacity is ascertained either experimentally or using isothermal parameters (Emenike et al. 2022b). As illustrated in Table 2, additional variables that influence an adsorbent's ability include the solution pH, temperature, and amount of the adsorbent. The surface area, which reveals the porosity and degree of active sites on the adsorbent, is another important contributing component.

Table 2

Adsorption performance of maize/corn adsorbents for dye uptake

Plant partsAdsorbent classAdsorbate dyeRE% (mg/g)Dosage (g/L)pHTemp (°C)SSA (m2/g)Method of determinationReferences
Cob MAC Gentian violet – 700.0 – 3.0 – – Dubinin-Radushkevich Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange – 555.56 – 6.5 25 784.76 Langmuir Wang et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 94.48 313.63 1.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.98 271.19 1.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 216.60 0.1 5.6 30 – Langmuir Jawad et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Indigo carmine 90.13 118.48 – – 25 809.80 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 100.0 0.02 7.0 – 650.0 Langmuir Reddy et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Congo red – 98.72 1.0 7.0 35 – Langmuir Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Maxilone – 86.89 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MBC Methyl orange – 86.38 – – – 468.59 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2020)  
Cob MB Malachite green 92.11 76.42 4.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 94.41 75.27 4.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Tartrazine 76.90 68.78 – – 25 809.80 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 99.3 66.52 – 6.0 – 13.29 Langmuir Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Congo red – 50.0 – – 30 – Langmuir Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 96.0 46.28 2.0 12.0 20 – Experiments Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 41.94 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 37.45 0.5 6.0 50 – Langmuir Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Malachite green – 35.34 – 4.0 – – Langmuir Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Crystal violet – 33.86 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.40 28.65 2.0 8.0 25 700.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Sulfur dioxide – 19.8 – – – 591.0 Experiments Wu et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 44.60 17.75 2.0 8.0 25 633.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MB Methylene blue – 16.08 – 6.5 – 0.40 Langmuir Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Cob MB Congo red – 4.83 – 7.0 – – Experiments Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 92.20 0.81 2.0 8.0 25 600.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MC Acid yellow – 0.24 – 4.0 – – Langmuir Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.90 – 5.0 – – – Experiments Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.89 – 10.0 6.0 27 – Experiments Tan et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Brilliant green 99.60 – 5.0 – – – Experiments Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 99.39 – 10.0 7.0 29 – Experiments Ismail et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Congo red 98.10 – 0.3 6.8 27 – Experiments Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Congo red 97.80 – 1.2 6.8 27 – Experiments Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 96.94 – 0.4 5.0 – – Langmuir Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Cob MB Bromophenol blue 96.53 – 4.0 2.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB Bromothymol blue 94.39 – 0.5 2.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MC Congo red 91.28 – 1.2 3.0 30 – Experiments Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 90.86 – 0.2 7.0 – 293.12 Experiments Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MB Direct blue 199 90.0 – 8.0 7.6 28 – Experiments Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 82.0 – – – – – Experiments Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange 80.36 – 5.0 – 25 – Experiments Abdullah et al. (2019)  
Cob MB Congo red 80.21 – 1.2 3.0 30 – Experiments Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC Rhodamine B 80.0 – – – – – Experiments Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 64.0 – – 8.0 25 – Experiments Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 33.38 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 98.4 89.0 2.0 5.4 57 – Langmuir Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Cover MC Alizarin red S – 10.5 0.2 2.0 – – Langmuir Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Ear MBC Methylene blue 44.13 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Fibre MAC Alcian blue  159.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Methylene blue – 70.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Neutral red – 50.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – 35.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Husk MC Methylene blue – 1,682.7 – 9.0 47 – Langmuir Guin et al. (2018)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue – 662.25 0.3 4.0 45 – Langmuir Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Husk MB Methylene blue – 50.69 2.0 6.0 25 – Langmuir Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 90.0 30.30 – 6.2 28 – Langmuir Malik et al. (2016)  
Husk MB Methylene blue – 20.66 – 6.5 – 2.49 Langmuir Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 98.50 – 5.0 10.3 25 3.01 Experiments Ponce et al. (2021)  
Husk leaf MAC Malachite green – 81.50 2.5 6.0 50 – Langmuir Jalil et al. (2012)  
Leaf MBC Methylene blue 89.32 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 93.00 13.85 – 9.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 71.00 4.93 – 9.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Malachite green 91.5 – 2.5 5.8 3.0 – Langmuir Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC Indigo carmen 91.0 – 0.3 12.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Pericarp MAC Methyl orange 50.0 141.13 – – – 23.31 Experiments Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Pericarp MB Methylene blue – 110.90 1.0 8.0 35 1.53 Langmuir Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Pith MAC Malachite green – 488.3 1.6 7.0 30 0.01 Langmuir Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Porous starch MAC Neutral red – 13.05 – – – 196.88 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Porous starch MAC Methylene blue – 12.94 – – – 196.88 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Root MBC Methylene blue 41.12 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Silk MB Methylene blue – 234.10 – 12.0 – – Langmuir Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Silk MB Reactive blue 19 99.00 71.60 5.0 2.0 25 – Langmuir Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Reactive red 218 99.00 63.30 5.0 2.0 25 – Langmuir Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MC Direct blue 15 99.76 – – 3.0 25 – Experiments Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Silk MBC Methylene blue 20.94 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 94.0 870.0 0.1 7.0 – – Langmuir Tang et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Congo red – 549.0 – – – 201.0 Experiments Li et al. (2019b)  
Stalk MB Methylene blue – 500.0 4.0 6.8 – – Langmuir Maghri et al. (2012)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 100.0 406.43 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 370.0 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Wen et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – 302.0 – – – 201.0 Experiments Li et al. (2019)b  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 86.0 230.39 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 97.0 129.0 2.0 9.0 35 – Langmuir Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MB Crystal violet 82.0 120 0.1 10.0 – – Experiments Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 99.70 49.01 0.2 – 50 – Experiments Ma et al. (2017)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 41.0 43.14 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Acid orange – 31.06 – 3.0 30 42.60 Langmuir Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Acid red – 30.77 – 3.0 30 42.60 Langmuir Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Malachite green – 27.55 – 6.0 60 45.3 Langmuir Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Direct red 23 99.00 27.11 0.2 3.0 25 – Langmuir Fathi et al. (2015)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 26.60 – 6.0 60 45.3 Langmuir Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MB Malachite green – 11.77 – 6.0 – 4.79 Langmuir Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 8.75 – – – – Langmuir Wu et al. (2017)  
Stalk MAC Rhodamine B 89.60 5.60 2.5 3.0 – – Langmuir Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 99.50 2.34 1.4 11.0 – – Langmuir Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MBC Phenol 95.88 – – – 25 325.90 Experiments Li et al. (2019a)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 90.00 – – 7.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk UM Coomaise brilliant blue 85.0 – 2.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MB Congo red 84.70 – – – – – Experiments Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 80.0 – 2.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Alizarin yellow 75.85 – 0.6 – 30 – Langmuir Ismail et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 50.0 – 4.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 23.32 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC Malachite green – 450.78 – – 20 1,187.00 Langmuir Kang et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Crystal violet – 566.27 0.25 10 45 – Experiments Peng et al. (2021)  
Stalk pith MAC Methylene blue – 422.13 0.25 10 25 – Experiments Peng et al. (2021)  
Starch MAC Tartrazine – 293.0 – 2.5 35 – Langmuir Dai et al. (2017)  
Starch MB Methylene blue – 6.40 – – – 0.42 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Starch MB Neutral red – 5.87 – – – 0.42 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Stem MAC Bromophenol blue – – – – – – Experiments Dada et al. (2012)  
Stem MAC Methyl orange solution – – – – – – Experiments Dada et al. (2012)  
Stem tissue MB Eriochrome black T 66.80 167.01 1.0 2.0 25 7.23 Langmuir Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stem tissue MB Methylene blue 99.90 160.84 1.0 6.0 25 7.23 Langmuir Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stigmata MB Methylene blue 33.90 106.30 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Stigmata MB Indigo carmine 69.68 63.70 – 2.0 – – Experiments Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Stover MAC Reactive red 141 – 15.65 3.0 3.0 – 0.69 Langmuir Carijo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Rhodamine B – 1,578.0 – 7.0 – 1,993.00 Langmuir Chen et al. (2019)  
Straw MB Malachite green – 524.25 – 6.0 55 0.85 Experiments Lima et al. (2018)  
Straw MBC Malachite green 99.00 515.77 0.3 6.0 25 80.10 Langmuir Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Straw MB Malachite green 77.0 200.0 0.5 6.0 55 0.85 Experiments Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC Methylene blue – 196.46 – 6.0 60 – Experiments Zhao et al. (2014)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant red K-2BP 83.40 178.75 2.0 3.0 45 937.0 Langmuir Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Green 40 – 152.75 – 2.0 – – Langmuir Umpuch (2015)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow K-6G 79.30 140.84 2.0 3.0 45 937.0 Langmuir Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Yellow 20 95.67 – – 2.0 – 4.21 Experiments Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MAC Blue 21 94.70 – – 2.0 – 4.21 Experiments Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC Acidic black – 70.90 – 1.0 – 20.34 Experiments Gao et al. (2021)  
Straw pith MAC Malachite green – 242.13 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Methylene blue – 215.05 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Rhodamine B – 213.68 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Tassel MAC Methylene blue – 200.0 – 10.0 30 – Langmuir Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Tassel MBC Methylene blue 59.08 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Tassel powder MAC Reactive red 198 97.00 16.95 2.0 3.0 – – Langmuir Dehvari et al. (2013)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classAdsorbate dyeRE% (mg/g)Dosage (g/L)pHTemp (°C)SSA (m2/g)Method of determinationReferences
Cob MAC Gentian violet – 700.0 – 3.0 – – Dubinin-Radushkevich Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange – 555.56 – 6.5 25 784.76 Langmuir Wang et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 94.48 313.63 1.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.98 271.19 1.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 216.60 0.1 5.6 30 – Langmuir Jawad et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Indigo carmine 90.13 118.48 – – 25 809.80 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 100.0 0.02 7.0 – 650.0 Langmuir Reddy et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Congo red – 98.72 1.0 7.0 35 – Langmuir Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Maxilone – 86.89 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MBC Methyl orange – 86.38 – – – 468.59 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2020)  
Cob MB Malachite green 92.11 76.42 4.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 94.41 75.27 4.0 12.0 25 – Langmuir Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Tartrazine 76.90 68.78 – – 25 809.80 Langmuir Zhang et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 99.3 66.52 – 6.0 – 13.29 Langmuir Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Congo red – 50.0 – – 30 – Langmuir Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 96.0 46.28 2.0 12.0 20 – Experiments Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 41.94 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue – 37.45 0.5 6.0 50 – Langmuir Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Malachite green – 35.34 – 4.0 – – Langmuir Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Crystal violet – 33.86 0.1 10.0 45 – Langmuir Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.40 28.65 2.0 8.0 25 700.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Sulfur dioxide – 19.8 – – – 591.0 Experiments Wu et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 44.60 17.75 2.0 8.0 25 633.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MB Methylene blue – 16.08 – 6.5 – 0.40 Langmuir Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Cob MB Congo red – 4.83 – 7.0 – – Experiments Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 92.20 0.81 2.0 8.0 25 600.00 Langmuir El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MC Acid yellow – 0.24 – 4.0 – – Langmuir Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.90 – 5.0 – – – Experiments Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 99.89 – 10.0 6.0 27 – Experiments Tan et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Brilliant green 99.60 – 5.0 – – – Experiments Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 99.39 – 10.0 7.0 29 – Experiments Ismail et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Congo red 98.10 – 0.3 6.8 27 – Experiments Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Congo red 97.80 – 1.2 6.8 27 – Experiments Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 96.94 – 0.4 5.0 – – Langmuir Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Cob MB Bromophenol blue 96.53 – 4.0 2.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB Bromothymol blue 94.39 – 0.5 2.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MC Congo red 91.28 – 1.2 3.0 30 – Experiments Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 90.86 – 0.2 7.0 – 293.12 Experiments Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MB Direct blue 199 90.0 – 8.0 7.6 28 – Experiments Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 82.0 – – – – – Experiments Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange 80.36 – 5.0 – 25 – Experiments Abdullah et al. (2019)  
Cob MB Congo red 80.21 – 1.2 3.0 30 – Experiments Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC Rhodamine B 80.0 – – – – – Experiments Mohanraj et al. (2020)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 64.0 – – 8.0 25 – Experiments Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 33.38 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 98.4 89.0 2.0 5.4 57 – Langmuir Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Cover MC Alizarin red S – 10.5 0.2 2.0 – – Langmuir Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Ear MBC Methylene blue 44.13 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Fibre MAC Alcian blue  159.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Methylene blue – 70.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Neutral red – 50.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – 35.0 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Husk MC Methylene blue – 1,682.7 – 9.0 47 – Langmuir Guin et al. (2018)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue – 662.25 0.3 4.0 45 – Langmuir Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Husk MB Methylene blue – 50.69 2.0 6.0 25 – Langmuir Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 90.0 30.30 – 6.2 28 – Langmuir Malik et al. (2016)  
Husk MB Methylene blue – 20.66 – 6.5 – 2.49 Langmuir Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 98.50 – 5.0 10.3 25 3.01 Experiments Ponce et al. (2021)  
Husk leaf MAC Malachite green – 81.50 2.5 6.0 50 – Langmuir Jalil et al. (2012)  
Leaf MBC Methylene blue 89.32 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 93.00 13.85 – 9.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 71.00 4.93 – 9.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Malachite green 91.5 – 2.5 5.8 3.0 – Langmuir Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC Indigo carmen 91.0 – 0.3 12.0 30 – Langmuir Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Pericarp MAC Methyl orange 50.0 141.13 – – – 23.31 Experiments Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Pericarp MB Methylene blue – 110.90 1.0 8.0 35 1.53 Langmuir Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Pith MAC Malachite green – 488.3 1.6 7.0 30 0.01 Langmuir Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Porous starch MAC Neutral red – 13.05 – – – 196.88 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Porous starch MAC Methylene blue – 12.94 – – – 196.88 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Root MBC Methylene blue 41.12 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Silk MB Methylene blue – 234.10 – 12.0 – – Langmuir Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Silk MB Reactive blue 19 99.00 71.60 5.0 2.0 25 – Langmuir Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Reactive red 218 99.00 63.30 5.0 2.0 25 – Langmuir Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MC Direct blue 15 99.76 – – 3.0 25 – Experiments Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Silk MBC Methylene blue 20.94 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 94.0 870.0 0.1 7.0 – – Langmuir Tang et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Congo red – 549.0 – – – 201.0 Experiments Li et al. (2019b)  
Stalk MB Methylene blue – 500.0 4.0 6.8 – – Langmuir Maghri et al. (2012)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 100.0 406.43 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 370.0 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Wen et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – 302.0 – – – 201.0 Experiments Li et al. (2019)b  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 86.0 230.39 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 97.0 129.0 2.0 9.0 35 – Langmuir Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MB Crystal violet 82.0 120 0.1 10.0 – – Experiments Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 99.70 49.01 0.2 – 50 – Experiments Ma et al. (2017)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 41.0 43.14 – 11.0 – – Langmuir Liu et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Acid orange – 31.06 – 3.0 30 42.60 Langmuir Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Acid red – 30.77 – 3.0 30 42.60 Langmuir Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Malachite green – 27.55 – 6.0 60 45.3 Langmuir Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Direct red 23 99.00 27.11 0.2 3.0 25 – Langmuir Fathi et al. (2015)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 26.60 – 6.0 60 45.3 Langmuir Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MB Malachite green – 11.77 – 6.0 – 4.79 Langmuir Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue – 8.75 – – – – Langmuir Wu et al. (2017)  
Stalk MAC Rhodamine B 89.60 5.60 2.5 3.0 – – Langmuir Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 99.50 2.34 1.4 11.0 – – Langmuir Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MBC Phenol 95.88 – – – 25 325.90 Experiments Li et al. (2019a)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 90.00 – – 7.0 – – Experiments Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk UM Coomaise brilliant blue 85.0 – 2.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MB Congo red 84.70 – – – – – Experiments Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 80.0 – 2.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MAC Alizarin yellow 75.85 – 0.6 – 30 – Langmuir Ismail et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 50.0 – 4.0 3.0 25 – Experiments Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 23.32 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC Malachite green – 450.78 – – 20 1,187.00 Langmuir Kang et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Crystal violet – 566.27 0.25 10 45 – Experiments Peng et al. (2021)  
Stalk pith MAC Methylene blue – 422.13 0.25 10 25 – Experiments Peng et al. (2021)  
Starch MAC Tartrazine – 293.0 – 2.5 35 – Langmuir Dai et al. (2017)  
Starch MB Methylene blue – 6.40 – – – 0.42 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Starch MB Neutral red – 5.87 – – – 0.42 Experiments Guo et al. (2015b)  
Stem MAC Bromophenol blue – – – – – – Experiments Dada et al. (2012)  
Stem MAC Methyl orange solution – – – – – – Experiments Dada et al. (2012)  
Stem tissue MB Eriochrome black T 66.80 167.01 1.0 2.0 25 7.23 Langmuir Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stem tissue MB Methylene blue 99.90 160.84 1.0 6.0 25 7.23 Langmuir Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stigmata MB Methylene blue 33.90 106.30 – 7.0 – – Experiments Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Stigmata MB Indigo carmine 69.68 63.70 – 2.0 – – Experiments Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Stover MAC Reactive red 141 – 15.65 3.0 3.0 – 0.69 Langmuir Carijo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Rhodamine B – 1,578.0 – 7.0 – 1,993.00 Langmuir Chen et al. (2019)  
Straw MB Malachite green – 524.25 – 6.0 55 0.85 Experiments Lima et al. (2018)  
Straw MBC Malachite green 99.00 515.77 0.3 6.0 25 80.10 Langmuir Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Straw MB Malachite green 77.0 200.0 0.5 6.0 55 0.85 Experiments Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MAC Methylene blue – 196.46 – 6.0 60 – Experiments Zhao et al. (2014)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant red K-2BP 83.40 178.75 2.0 3.0 45 937.0 Langmuir Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Green 40 – 152.75 – 2.0 – – Langmuir Umpuch (2015)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow K-6G 79.30 140.84 2.0 3.0 45 937.0 Langmuir Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Yellow 20 95.67 – – 2.0 – 4.21 Experiments Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MAC Blue 21 94.70 – – 2.0 – 4.21 Experiments Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC Acidic black – 70.90 – 1.0 – 20.34 Experiments Gao et al. (2021)  
Straw pith MAC Malachite green – 242.13 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Methylene blue – 215.05 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Rhodamine B – 213.68 – 12.0 25 – Langmuir Chen et al. (2020)  
Tassel MAC Methylene blue – 200.0 – 10.0 30 – Langmuir Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Tassel MBC Methylene blue 59.08 – – – 25 2.72 Experiments Mu et al. (2020)  
Tassel powder MAC Reactive red 198 97.00 16.95 2.0 3.0 – – Langmuir Dehvari et al. (2013)  

Corn husks have been studied by Ponce et al. (2021) for their potential to remove methylene blue from liquids. The polymeric component of the fibre was removed from the biowaste using a 0.10 mol/L NaOH solution, which also helped to increase dye's adsorption. Characterization revealed that the main components of the corn husk adsorbent, which has a BET surface area of 3.01 m2/g, are cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. More than 90% of the dye was removed in 2 h, according to the adsorption analysis, which demonstrated that the alkali treatment boosted adsorbent's attractiveness towards the adsorbate. A composite made of corncob and GO was created by Qu et al. (2020), and its efficacy in the adsorptive removal of Congo red from wastewater was investigated. The outcome demonstrated the presence of many functional groups in the composite, including hydroxyl, carboxyl, phenol, and alcohol groups, which provided enough binding sites and facilitated dye adsorption. The amount of dye removed rose in response to an increase in adsorbent dosage and reached 80% in 60 min. The process was endothermic and involved chemical adsorption mechanisms. Similar to this, Zolgharnein et al. (2016) evaluated the efficacy of a composite sorbent for the removal of Alizarin red S dye from liquids by impregnating Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto corn cover in a ratio of 1:10. At ideal pH of 2, an adsorbent dosage of 0.2 g, and dye concentration of 10 mg/L, a maximum adsorption capacity of 11.35 mg/g, and a removal efficiency of 80.1% were achieved. The adsorption results were well fitted by pseudo-second-order kinetic, Langmuir, Freudlich, and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm models, whereas thermodynamic investigations suggested a spontaneous and exothermic process.

Li et al. (2019b) synthesized a cellulose-rich aerogel in a single step by using a linked solvent system to separate lignin from other corn stalk constituents. The aerogel has a huge surface area (201 m2/g), a porous, three-dimensional structure, and good thermal stability. Congo red and Coomassie brilliant blue had maximum adsorption capacities of 549 and 302 mg/g, respectively, according to a simulation of the aerogel adsorbent in dye-contaminated water. The study offers a practical, eco-friendly method for producing corn stalk material with good water treatment capabilities. Furthermore, Eltaweil et al. (2020) investigated the potential of a composite prepared from corn stalk biochar (CSB) and zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) to adsorb malachite green dye from solution. The results of the various techniques used to analyse the composite adsorbent, including FT-IR, XRD, SEM, and TGA, showed that it was a magnetic composite with a mesoporous structure, several functional groups, and a large surface area (80.1 m2/g). The adsorption data involved both adsorption and oxidation mechanisms, with a removal efficiency of up to 99.9% attained in 20 min. They also fit well with second-order reaction kinetics and the Langmuir isotherm. Comparing the adsorbent to the individual components (CSB and nZVI), it also demonstrated a higher adsorption capacity (515.77 mg/g), and its magnetic property makes separation easier. The summary of the findings is presented in Table 2.

In the chemistry of adsorption for pollution remediation, the key difficulty is choosing the most auspicious adsorbent materials, particularly those with the best combination of low cost, remarkable adsorption potential, excellent adsorption efficiency, good selectivity, and swift kinetics. To overcome these challenges, a grounded understanding of the adsorption mechanism is required. Besides, understanding the adsorption mechanism will offer a win–win insight into designing outstanding desorption tactics for the reclamation of decontaminated contaminants and the recyclability of spent adsorbents (Crini 2005; Crini et al. 2019). However, in a bid to undoubtedly pinpoint the adsorption mechanism(s) (particularly the adsorbent–adsorbate interface interactions) so as to easily overcome those aforementioned challenges and take the adsorption process to the next level, this also becomes another real challenge and is now an important topic (Crini 2005; Crini et al. 2019). Practically speaking, according to Crini et al. (2019), adsorption is simply a shift in an adsorbate molecule's concentration in the outer layer of a solid adsorbent matrix compared with the core layer per unit surface area. This simple explanation about adsorption is consistent with that of Sanghi & Verma (2013), who also accentuated that in the adsorption phenomenon, the accumulation or concentration of a substance (adsorbate) takes place at the adsorbent surface or interface compared with the bulk phase. However, to be perfectly frank, amid all these clear, real, simple, and practicable explanations of adsorption, its mechanistic operation is not wholly understood yet owing to the fact that there are so many potential interactions as shown in Figure 3, and the adsorbate properties (dissolution rate or miscibility, pKa, etc.), the analytical parameters (ionic strength, temperatures, kinetics), and the features of the adsorbent (surface area and architectural functional groups) all have a significant impact on these interactions (Crini 2005; Crini et al. 2019; Iwuozor et al. 2022b). But still, according to Crini et al. (2019), there is an intriguing query: Do the aforementioned interactions have to be considered to fully comprehend the adsorption mechanism? Well, this question's response is somewhat complicated. Depending on the adsorbent architectural makeup, the pollutant makeup and its characteristics, the solution pH, and the ionic strength, it is feasible that more than one of these interactions can take place concurrently in an adsorption process, as shown in the reports of previous studies (Yaneva & Georgieva 2013; Song et al. 2015; Guo et al. 2018; Soldatkina & Zavrichko 2018; Liu et al. 2019; Li et al. 2019a, 2019b; Zhang et al. 2020; Pezhhanfar & Zarei 2022) (Table 3).
Table 3

Optimum pH and mechanism for dye uptake by maize/corn adsorbents

Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeOptimum pHpHzcAdsorption mechanismReferences
Cob MB Methylene blue 6.5 –  interaction, hydrogen bonds Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.5 –  interaction, hydrogen bonds Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Stalk MBC Phenol – – Pore-filling, electrostatic attraction, interaction Li et al. (2019)a  
Stalk MAC Acid red 3.0 5.1 Ion exchange, chemisorption Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Acid orange 3.0 5.1 Ion exchange, chemisorption Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Congo red – – Hydrogen bonding, interaction Li et al. (2019b)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – – Hydrogen bonding, interaction Li et al. (2019b)  
Pericarp MB Methylene blue 8.0 3.6 Electrostatic repulsion Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Cob MB Congo red 7.0 7.2 Electrostatic interactions, H-bonding, hydrophobic–hydrophobic interactions Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MBC Methyl orange – – Electrostatic interactions, electron sharing, electron exchange Zhang et al. (2020)  
Silk MB Reactive blue 19 12.0 – Electrostatic interactions Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Reactive red 218 12.0 – Electrostatic interactions Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 11.0 – Electrostatic interactions Wen et al. (2018)  
Stem tissue MB Methylene blue 6.0 2.4 Electrostatic interactions Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stem tissue MB Eriochrome black T 2.0 2.4 Electrostatic interactions Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Straw MAC Green 40 2.0 – Electrostatic interactions Umpuch (2015)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 11.0 – Electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, stacking, physical interaction Liu et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MB Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Direct red 23 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, chemical reaction Fathi et al. (2015)  
Cob MB Congo red 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MC Congo red 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 5.4 4.1 Electrostatic interaction Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Pith MAC Malachite green 7.0 – Electrostatic interaction Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Rhodamine B 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Stigmata MB Methylene blue 7.0 – Electrostatic interaction Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Gentian violet 3.0 3.15 Electrostatic attraction Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Congo red 7.0 – Electrostatic attraction Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Cob MB Bromophenol blue 2.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB Bromothymol blue 2.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.2 – Electrostatic attraction Malik et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 11.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 9.0 5.7 Electrostatic attraction Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 7.0 4.8 Electrostatic attraction Tang et al. (2021)  
Stigmata MB Indigo carmine 2.0 – Electrostatic attraction Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow K-6G 3.0 – Electrostatic attraction Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant red K-2BP 3.0 – Electrostatic attraction Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – Electrostatic attraction Zhao et al. (2014)  
Tassel MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – Electrostatic attraction Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Stalk MB Crystal violet 10.0 – Chemisorption Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 11.0 – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Brilliant green 11.0 – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Crystal violet 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Maxilone 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC Acetic acid 5.6 – – Dina et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 8.0 – – El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 5.6 4.0 – Jawad et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Congo red 6.8 – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 6.0 – – Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Reddy et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 7.0 – – Ismail et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Tan et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange 6.5 – – Wang et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Malachite green 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 5.0 – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Cob MB Direct blue 199 7.6 – – Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 8.0 – – Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Malachite green 4.0 – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MC Acid yellow 4.0 – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Cover MC Alizarin red S 2.0 – – Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Fibre MAC Alcian blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Neutral red 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 4.0 – – Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 10.3 3.8 – Ponce et al. (2021)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.0 – – Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MC Methylene blue 9.0 – – Guin et al. (2018)  
Husk leaf MAC Malachite green 8.0 – – Jalil et al. (2012)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 9.0 – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 9.0 – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Indigo carmen 12.0 – – Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC Malachite green 10.0 – – Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Pericarp MAC Methyl orange – 11.2 – Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Methylene blue 12.0 – – Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Silk MC Direct blue 15 3.0 – – Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Malachite green 6.0 – – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 3.0 – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 5.0 – – Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MB Congo red 5.0 – – Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 6.0 6.8 – Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Stalk MB Methylene blue 6.8 – – Maghri et al. (2012)  
Stalk MB Coomaise brilliant blue 3.0 – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC Malachite green 6.5 – – Kang et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Stalk pith MAC Crystal violet 10.0 – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Starch MAC Tartrazine 2.5 – – Dai et al. (2017)  
Stover MAC Reactive red 141 3.0 – – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Blue 21 2.0 – – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MAC Yellow 20 2.0 – – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MB Malachite green 6.0 2.3 – Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MB Malachite green 6.0 – – Lima et al. (2018)  
Straw MBC Malachite green 9.0 – – Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC Acidic black 4.0  – Gao et al. (2021)  
Straw pith MAC Malachite green 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Rhodamine B 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Tassel powder MAC Reactive red 198 9.0 – – Dehvari et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 12.0   Farnane et al. (2018)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeOptimum pHpHzcAdsorption mechanismReferences
Cob MB Methylene blue 6.5 –  interaction, hydrogen bonds Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.5 –  interaction, hydrogen bonds Pezhhanfar & Zarei (2021)  
Stalk MBC Phenol – – Pore-filling, electrostatic attraction, interaction Li et al. (2019)a  
Stalk MAC Acid red 3.0 5.1 Ion exchange, chemisorption Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Acid orange 3.0 5.1 Ion exchange, chemisorption Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
Stalk MAC Congo red – – Hydrogen bonding, interaction Li et al. (2019b)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue – – Hydrogen bonding, interaction Li et al. (2019b)  
Pericarp MB Methylene blue 8.0 3.6 Electrostatic repulsion Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Cob MB Congo red 7.0 7.2 Electrostatic interactions, H-bonding, hydrophobic–hydrophobic interactions Yaneva & Georgieva (2013)  
Cob MBC Methyl orange – – Electrostatic interactions, electron sharing, electron exchange Zhang et al. (2020)  
Silk MB Reactive blue 19 12.0 – Electrostatic interactions Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Reactive red 218 12.0 – Electrostatic interactions Değermenci et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 11.0 – Electrostatic interactions Wen et al. (2018)  
Stem tissue MB Methylene blue 6.0 2.4 Electrostatic interactions Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Stem tissue MB Eriochrome black T 2.0 2.4 Electrostatic interactions Vučurović et al. (2014)  
Straw MAC Green 40 2.0 – Electrostatic interactions Umpuch (2015)  
Stalk MBC Methylene blue 11.0 – Electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, stacking, physical interaction Liu et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Straw MB Tylosin 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions Guo et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Direct red 23 12.0 – Electrostatic interaction, chemical reaction Fathi et al. (2015)  
Cob MB Congo red 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob MC Congo red 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Qu et al. (2020)  
Cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 5.4 4.1 Electrostatic interaction Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
Pith MAC Malachite green 7.0 – Electrostatic interaction Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Rhodamine B 3.0 – Electrostatic interaction Mousavi et al. (2021)  
Stigmata MB Methylene blue 7.0 – Electrostatic interaction Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Gentian violet 3.0 3.15 Electrostatic attraction Javed et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Congo red 7.0 – Electrostatic attraction Velmurugan et al. (2016)  
Cob MB Bromophenol blue 2.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Cob MB Bromothymol blue 2.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.2 – Electrostatic attraction Malik et al. (2016)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 11.0 5.0 Electrostatic attraction Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 9.0 5.7 Electrostatic attraction Tang et al. (2019)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 7.0 4.8 Electrostatic attraction Tang et al. (2021)  
Stigmata MB Indigo carmine 2.0 – Electrostatic attraction Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow K-6G 3.0 – Electrostatic attraction Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Reactive brilliant red K-2BP 3.0 – Electrostatic attraction Ren et al. (2020)  
Straw MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – Electrostatic attraction Zhao et al. (2014)  
Tassel MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – Electrostatic attraction Olorundare et al. (2014)  
Stalk MB Crystal violet 10.0 – Chemisorption Muhammad et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 11.0 – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Brilliant green 11.0 – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Crystal violet 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Maxilone 10.0 – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Cob MAC Acetic acid 5.6 – – Dina et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 8.0 – – El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 5.6 4.0 – Jawad et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Congo red 6.8 – – Leelavathy et al. (2015)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Miyah et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 6.0 – – Ojediran et al. (2021)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Ramamoorthy et al. (2020)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Reddy et al. (2016)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 7.0 – – Ismail et al. (2018)  
Cob MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Tan et al. (2012)  
Cob MAC Methyl orange 6.5 – – Wang et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Malachite green 12.0 – – Farnane et al. (2018)  
Cob MB Methylene blue 5.0 – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Cob MB Direct blue 199 7.6 – – Saroj et al. (2015)  
Cob MBC Methylene blue 8.0 – – Tsamo et al. (2019)  
Cob MC Malachite green 4.0 – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Cob MC Acid yellow 4.0 – – Ong et al. (2017)  
Cover MC Alizarin red S 2.0 – – Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Fibre MAC Alcian blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Methylene blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Neutral red 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Fibre MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 7.0 – – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 4.0 – – Khodaie et al. (2013)  
Husk MAC Methylene blue 10.3 3.8 – Ponce et al. (2021)  
Husk MB Methylene blue 6.0 – – Paşka et al. (2014)  
Husk MC Methylene blue 9.0 – – Guin et al. (2018)  
Husk leaf MAC Malachite green 8.0 – – Jalil et al. (2012)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 9.0 – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Methyl orange 9.0 – – Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Leaves MAC Indigo carmen 12.0 – – Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Leaves MAC Malachite green 10.0 – – Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Pericarp MAC Methyl orange – 11.2 – Loya-González et al. (2019)  
Silk MB Methylene blue 12.0 – – Miraboutalebi et al. (2017)  
Silk MC Direct blue 15 3.0 – – Nadaroğlu et al. (2018)  
Stalk MAC Methylene blue 6.0 – – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Malachite green 6.0 – – Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
Stalk MAC Coomaise brilliant blue 3.0 – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 5.0 – – Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MB Congo red 5.0 – – Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Stalk MB Malachite green 6.0 6.8 – Lara-Vásquez et al. (2016)  
Stalk MB Methylene blue 6.8 – – Maghri et al. (2012)  
Stalk MB Coomaise brilliant blue 3.0 – – Taha et al. (2021)  
Stalk + walnut shell MAC Malachite green 6.5 – – Kang et al. (2018)  
Stalk pith MAC Methylene blue 10.0 – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Stalk pith MAC Crystal violet 10.0 – – Peng et al. (2021)  
Starch MAC Tartrazine 2.5 – – Dai et al. (2017)  
Stover MAC Reactive red 141 3.0 – – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Straw MAC Blue 21 2.0 – – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MAC Yellow 20 2.0 – – Umpuch & Jutarat (2013)  
Straw MB Malachite green 6.0 2.3 – Lima et al. (2017)  
Straw MB Malachite green 6.0 – – Lima et al. (2018)  
Straw MBC Malachite green 9.0 – – Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
Straw + waste red mud MBC Acidic black 4.0  – Gao et al. (2021)  
Straw pith MAC Malachite green 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Methylene blue 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Straw pith MAC Rhodamine B 12.0 – – Chen et al. (2020)  
Tassel powder MAC Reactive red 198 9.0 – – Dehvari et al. (2013)  
Cob MAC Malachite green 12.0   Farnane et al. (2018)  
Figure 3

Plausible mechanistic corn adsorbent–adsorbate interactions (Barquilha & Braga 2021).

Figure 3

Plausible mechanistic corn adsorbent–adsorbate interactions (Barquilha & Braga 2021).

Close modal

Furthermore, it is interesting to say that since the adsorption phenomenon is invariably influenced by the aforementioned experimental conditions, isotherm and kinetics models of best-fit hypotheses as well as thermodynamic parameters can be used in some cases to open up adsorbent–adsorbate interaction mysteries and identify the most plausible adsorption mechanism (Abdelwahab 2008; Danish et al. 2011; Iwuozor et al. 2022b). For instance, Guo et al. (2018) established in their study that the adsorption mechanism of tylosin onto maize straw adsorbent and its composite follow the pseudo-second-order kinetics that reflect chemisorption, and this conforms with most studies (Table 3) except for Muhammad et al. (2019), who differed in their claim and noted that chemisorption occurs through allocation electrons between cornstalk sorbent and crystal violet. Guo et al. (2018) further explained that based on the characterization result, the adsorbent contains numerous oxygen-containing moieties, such as OH, and hence H-bonding may participate in the adsorption course under acidic conditions, and tylosin adsorption on the adsorbents may be ascribed to hydrophobic interactions. Fathi et al. (2015) in their own study thermodynamically established that the negative value of ΔSo implies that the adsorption process occurs via electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent surface and adsorbate molecules in the solution. Both Guo et al. (2018) and Fathi et al. (2015) also pointed out that the negative value of ΔGo with the decreasing temperature makes the adsorption easier.

In addition, most reports in Table 3 empirically confirm that the amount of electrostatic charges that the dye pollutant contributes throughout the adsorption process is strongly governed by pH, and this can be easily explained using pHzc (when the adsorbent's surface is uncharged and in other words, when there is no net charge associated with the functional group charge). For example, as the pH of the solution rises, the surface potential becomes highly negative (when pH is > pHzc), intensifying the electrostatic impact. When the pH falls below pHzc, the surface charge turns positive, making it challenging to adsorb negatively charged dye molecules (Wang & Wang 2008; Rosas-Castor et al. 2014; Kamarehie et al. 2019; Mousavi et al. 2021). This practical explanation is in good agreement with the one reported by Yaneva & Georgieva (2013) and Velmurugan et al. (2016) for the adsorption of Congo red dye, where they observed that at pH < pHzc, the surface of the unmodified and modified corn cob adsorbent was positively charged, and this was advantageous for electrostatic interactions between dye anions (negatively charged dye SO3 groups) and the adsorbent surface. Conversely, Yaneva & Georgieva (2013) noticed that the adsorption of the anionic dye diminished with an uptick in pH (pH 8–9), and this occurrence was linked to both the overabundance of OH ions in the solution that contend for the adsorption sites on corn cob as well as the negative charge on the surface of the adsorbent. The forgoing account is consistent with the one established by Ren et al. (2020), and they also added that in an acidic condition, the protonation influence of a functional group such as SO3 improves the electrostatic attraction between the dye and adsorbents, and as a result, the upsurge in the concentration of H+ was advantageous for the adsorption of reactive brilliant dyes yellow and red. In another study conducted by Zhang et al. (2020) using corn cob biochar for the degradation of Methyl Orange (MO), it was discovered that the foundation of the oxidizing capacity of the corn cob biochar for the degradation of MO dye was taking into account the OH radical present at the biochar adsorbent surface, which vehemently struck and destroyed the N = N bond of the dye, followed by a ring-opening reaction to produce giant CnH2n+2, and final mineralization into CO2 and H2O molecules. It was further affirmed that electrostatic interactions, electron sharing, and electron transfer worked in concert with the radical attack to produce the MO's adsorption process (Zhang et al. 2020). Rosas-Castor et al. (2014) did not differ in their own mechanistic line of thought as well, as they suggest from their experimental findings that maize biosorbent (MB) is adsorbed predominantly on the biosorbent surface by electrostatic attraction and complexation mechanisms. Notably, as established by Barquilha & Braga (2021) and as shown in Table 3, H-bond, π–π interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and electrostatic interaction are predominant for dye adsorption. Also, as expounded by Moradi & Sharma (2021), the numerous active sites on the surface of adsorbents may be related to the charge of the dye ions as well as the active sites. The amount of adsorbed dye reduces as pH values drop because the surface charge virtually becomes positively charged, which makes cationic dye molecules more competitive with H+. Meanwhile, for anionic dye, which can quickly bind to the adsorbent, this condition is more preferable. However, as the pH level in the system rises, a significant volume of OH ions will be released, increasing the number of negatively charged sites. A negatively charged surface affects cationic dyes in a variety of ways, but it has no effect on the adsorption of anionic dyes.

Adsorption isotherms are generally used for describing the adsorption behaviour and evaluating the adsorption capacity of materials used for environmental remediation (Emenike et al. 2023; Ohale et al. 2023). Different adsorption models have been described in the literature to particularly monitor the uptake capacity of maize/corn adsorbents in the removal of dyes. A summary of these isotherm models and associated parameters is presented in Table 4. The practical operation of an adsorption system requires that the equilibrium data be correlated either by an empirical or theoretical equation (Iwuozor et al. 2022c). Many such equations abound in the open literature. However, the foregoing analysis of adsorption isotherms used to model the uptake capacity of maize/corn adsorbents showed that Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were the most popular and frequently used isotherms used to describe the fit of the equilibrium data.

Table 4

Best-fit isotherm and kinetic models for maize/corn adsorbents for dye uptake

Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeIsotherm models
Kinetic models
References
Best fitModel typeR2Best fitModel typeR2
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.938 – – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.999 Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Corn stalk MB Congo red Langmuir Linear 0.991 PSO Linear 0.999 Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Corn stover MAC Reactive red 141 Langmuir Nonlinear 0.997 PSO Nonlinear 0.995 Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Methyl violet Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Aljeboree et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Temkin Linear 0.996 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Crystal violet Freundlich Linear 0.995 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Maxilone blue Temkin Linear 0.997 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Corn cob MAC Brilliant green Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Corn straw MAC Rhodamine B Freundlich Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.999 Chen et al. (2019)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.902 – – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.999 PSO Linear 0.989 Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.999 PSO Linear 0.999 Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.986 – – – El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Corn leaves MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.924 PFO Linear 0.930 Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Corn leaves MB Indigo carmen Freundlich Linear 0.926 PSO Linear 0.993 Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MAC Methylene blue Temkin Linear 0.977 PSO Linear 0.995 Ge et al. (2016)  
Corn stalks MB Direct red 23 Freundlich Linear 0.993 PSO Linear 0.999 Fathi et al. (2015)  
Corn leaves MB Methyl orange Freundlich Linear 0.964 PFO Linear 0.908 Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Corn leaves MAC Methyl orange Langmuir Linear 0.915 PSO Linear 0.990 Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Corn straw MBC Acid black Diffusion chemisorption model Linear 0.972 Elovich Linear 0.990 Gao et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MBC Amino black Diffusion chemisorption model Linear 0.999 Elovich Linear 0.999 Gao et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.978 PSO Linear 0.992 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MB Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.941 PSO Linear 0.983 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.955 PSO Linear 0.960 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.937 PSO Linear 0.997 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn stalks MAC Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.998 Kang et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MB Gentian violet Freundlich Linear 0.995 PSO Linear 1.000 Javed et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.944 PFO Linear 0.998 Jawad et al. (2018)  
Corn pith MAC Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.996 PFO Linear 0.988 Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Corn straw MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.99 Elovich Linear 0.99 Lima et al. (2017)  
Corn straw MAC Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.99 Elovich Linear 0.99 Lima et al. (2017)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.99 PSO Linear 1.00 Medhat et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MC Green 40 Langmuir Linear 0.994 PSO Linear 0.999 Umpuch (2015)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeIsotherm models
Kinetic models
References
Best fitModel typeR2Best fitModel typeR2
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.938 – – – Aljeboree et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.999 Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Corn stalk MB Congo red Langmuir Linear 0.991 PSO Linear 0.999 Abubakar & Batagarawa (2017)  
Corn stover MAC Reactive red 141 Langmuir Nonlinear 0.997 PSO Nonlinear 0.995 Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Methyl violet Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Aljeboree et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Temkin Linear 0.996 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Crystal violet Freundlich Linear 0.995 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Maxilone blue Temkin Linear 0.997 – – – Aljeboree & Alkaim (2019)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Corn cob MAC Brilliant green Freundlich Linear 0.994 – – – Ali et al. (2017)  
Corn straw MAC Rhodamine B Freundlich Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.999 Chen et al. (2019)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.902 – – – Fatoye & Onigbinde (2020)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.999 PSO Linear 0.989 Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.999 PSO Linear 0.999 Dutta & Nath (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.986 – – – El-Sayed et al. (2014)  
Corn leaves MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.924 PFO Linear 0.930 Fadhel et al. (2021)  
Corn leaves MB Indigo carmen Freundlich Linear 0.926 PSO Linear 0.993 Fadhil et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MAC Methylene blue Temkin Linear 0.977 PSO Linear 0.995 Ge et al. (2016)  
Corn stalks MB Direct red 23 Freundlich Linear 0.993 PSO Linear 0.999 Fathi et al. (2015)  
Corn leaves MB Methyl orange Freundlich Linear 0.964 PFO Linear 0.908 Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Corn leaves MAC Methyl orange Langmuir Linear 0.915 PSO Linear 0.990 Fadhil & Eisa (2019)  
Corn straw MBC Acid black Diffusion chemisorption model Linear 0.972 Elovich Linear 0.990 Gao et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MBC Amino black Diffusion chemisorption model Linear 0.999 Elovich Linear 0.999 Gao et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MB Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.978 PSO Linear 0.992 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MB Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.941 PSO Linear 0.983 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.955 PSO Linear 0.960 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MAC Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.937 PSO Linear 0.997 Farnane et al. (2018)  
Corn stalks MAC Malachite green Langmuir Linear 0.998 PSO Linear 0.998 Kang et al. (2018)  
Corn cob MB Gentian violet Freundlich Linear 0.995 PSO Linear 1.000 Javed et al. (2021)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Freundlich Linear 0.944 PFO Linear 0.998 Jawad et al. (2018)  
Corn pith MAC Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.996 PFO Linear 0.988 Jothirani et al. (2016)  
Corn straw MB Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.99 Elovich Linear 0.99 Lima et al. (2017)  
Corn straw MAC Malachite green Freundlich Linear 0.99 Elovich Linear 0.99 Lima et al. (2017)  
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue Langmuir Linear 0.99 PSO Linear 1.00 Medhat et al. (2021)  
Corn straw MC Green 40 Langmuir Linear 0.994 PSO Linear 0.999 Umpuch (2015)  

The Freundlich isotherm, which assumes that multilayer adsorption occurs through a heterogenous surface (Freundlich 1906), is mathematically expressed as follows:
formula
where is the equilibrium concentration of the pollutant in solution (mg/L), x/m is the amount of pollutant adsorbed (mg/g), and and n are Freundlich constants (Yang 1998). The two Freundlich constants are indicative of certain adsorptive interpretations; a decreased n value corresponds to an increase in surface heterogeneity post-adsorption, while the increase in is an indication of the availability of more active sites for adsorption (Ali et al. 2020).
On the other hand, the Langmuir isotherm describes adsorption as occurring on a homogenous surface. It posits that there is no further adsorption once an adsorbed molecule enters a site (Günay et al. 2007). The linear expression of the Langmuir isotherm is given as follows:
formula
where is the equilibrium concentration (mg/L), is the equilibrium quantity adsorbed (mg/g), and and b are adsorption efficiency constant and adsorption energy constant, respectively (Langmuir 1916).

The reviewed studies in Table 4 showed that most of the studies, regardless of adsorbent type, were better fitted to the Freundlich isotherm. The Freundlich isotherm gave a better description of the experimental data, and this was reflected in the relatively high correlation coefficients observed in the studies. However, there were cases where a particular adsorbent type was better fitted to more than one isotherm model. For instance, activated carbon of different plant parts was shown to be predominantly fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, and sometimes to Temkin isotherm. There is another instance where the unmodified form of a plant part is fitted to Freundlich isotherm, and at other times to Langmuir isotherm. The variations exhibited by this adsorbent class could be due to variations in the adsorbate.

Adsorption kinetics provides useful information on the mass transfer mechanisms, efficiency of adsorbent used, and adsorption rate. The information provided by the adsorption kinetics is required for the design of the adsorption system (Wang & Guo 2020). There are several models of adsorption kinetics, including the Elovich model, the mixed-order model, the pseudo-first-order model, and the pseudo-second-order model, among others. The linear equations of the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and Elovich models are presented in the following equations:
formula
formula
formula

Based on the studies reviewed, the pseudo-second-order model exhibited the best fit predominantly. However, there were cases in which the pseudo-first-order and Elovich models exhibited best fit although they had minimal frequency. It is then important to estimate the basic assumption of the pseudo-second-order model. The pseudo-second-order model assumes that the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process is chemisorption. This means that the rate of adsorption is not dependent on adsorbate concentration but on adsorption capacity (Sahoo & Prelot 2020).

The mechanism of adsorption can be further investigated by a thermodynamic process to ascertain the level of electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and adsorbing species at a given temperature. The nature of adsorption from temperature effect variations is elucidated on the basis of adsorption enthalpy (ΔHo), entropy (ΔSo), and Gibbs free energy (ΔGo). Table 5 lists the values of thermodynamic parameters that were ascertained at various temperatures from certain publications.

Table 5

Summary of thermodynamics parameters for maize/corn adsorbents for dye uptake

Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeThermodynamics
References
Temp (K) (kJ/mol) (kJ/mol) (J/mol.K)
Corn silk MB Reactive blue (RB19) 298 0.4765 7.70 24.22 Değermenci et al. (2019)  
   308 0.2343    
   318 −0.0079    
   328 −0.2502    
Corn silk MB Reactive red (RR218) 298 1.8232 26.44 82.57 Değermenci et al. (2019)  
   308 0.9975    
   318 0.1717    
   328 −0.6540    
Corn straw composite MC Malachite green 298 −8.89 40.90 167.08 Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
   303 −9.72    
   308 −10.56    
   313 −11.39    
Corn stalk MB Direct red (DR23) 283.15 −4.793 57.481 228.29 Fathi et al. (2015)  
   288.15 −5.285    
   298.15 −6.336    
   308.15 −7.394    
   318.15 −8.120    
Corn straw MC Methylene blue 298 −9.25 −42.66 −111.37 Ge et al. (2016)  
   318 −7.75    
   338 −4.74    
Maize stover MC Methyl red 293 −5.00 7.865 0.0439 Guyo et al. (2017)  
   303 −5.44    
   313 −5.88    
   323 −46.32    
Maize husk leaf MC Malachite green 303 −5.93 32.4 127 Jalil et al. (2012)  
   313 −7.19    
   323 −8.46    
Corn cob MBC Methylene blue 313 −67.80 25.5 139.6 Jawad et al. (2018)  
   323 −69.20    
   333 −70.50    
Corn straw MB Malachite green 298 −22.4 54.4 0.03 Lima et al. (2017)  
   308 −25.5    
   318 −26.9    
   328 −30.6    
Corn straw MB Malachite green 298 −22.4 63.8 0.03 Lima et al. (2017)  
   308 −26.3    
   318 −28.5    
   328 −31.3    
Corn straw core MB Methylene blue 298 −1.67 −29.95 −87.56 Liu et al. (2018b)  
   318 −0.55    
   338 1.88    
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue 293 −26.8 9.5 124 Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
   313 −28.9    
   333 −31.8    
Corn stalk MB Malachite green 293 −26.3 11.8 130 Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
   313 −28.6    
   333 −31.5    
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet 298.15 −16.549 1.50 0.15 Mittal et al. (2018)  
   308.15 −17.873    
   318.15 −19.558    
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue 293 −7.616 37.442 153.783 Miyah et al. (2016)  
   303 −9.154    
   313 −10.692    
   323 −12.221    
Corn cob MAC Congo red 303 −32.27 −20.91 0.064 Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
   313 −34.46    
   323 −35.76    
Corn husk MC Methylene blue 300 −1.16 18.1 64 Guin et al. (2018)  
   310 −1.74    
   320 −2.38    
Corn husk MB Methylene blue 298 −6.5651 −4.3792 15.9408 Paşka et al. (2014)  
   313 −6.5755    
   333 −5.6497    
Corn straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow 298 −7.05 1.61 29.05 Ren et al. (2020)  
   308 −7.34    
   318 −7.63    
Corn straw MAC Reactive brilliant red 298 −7.08 1.41 28.47 Ren et al. (2020)  
   308 −7.36    
   318 −7.65    
Maize cob MB Bromophenol blue 298 −5.039 −4.226 0.003 Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
   303 −5.052    
   308 −5.066    
   313 −5.079    
   318 −5.093    
Maize cob MB Bromothymol blue 298 −1.528 6.871 0.028 Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
   303 −1.669    
   308 −1.810    
   313 −1.951    
   318 −2.092    
Corn cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 303 −12.57 −14.43 −0.0061 Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
   318 −12.47    
   333 −12.38    
Corn stalk MB Acidic red 303 −30.2 −9.0 70 Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
   318 −31.3    
   328 −31.9    
Corn stalk MB Acidic orange 303 −30.0 −14.0 53 Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
   318 −31.2    
   328 −31.3    
Maize cob MBC Methylene blue 298 −1.44 −11.908 −0.037 Tsamo et al. (2019)  
   303 0.23    
   318 −0.36    
   333 0.41    
Corn stalk MC Methylene blue 303.15 −4.956 −21.471 −0.054 Wen et al. (2018)  
   313.15 −4.454    
   323.15 −3.817    
   333.15 −3.353    
Corn cover MC Alizarin red S 298 −1.51 −2.81 −4.6 Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Corn stover MC Indigo carmine 288 −23,485 2.914 491.4 Ahmad et al. (2021)  
   298 −26,770    
   308 −28,478    
   318 −29,572    
Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeThermodynamics
References
Temp (K) (kJ/mol) (kJ/mol) (J/mol.K)
Corn silk MB Reactive blue (RB19) 298 0.4765 7.70 24.22 Değermenci et al. (2019)  
   308 0.2343    
   318 −0.0079    
   328 −0.2502    
Corn silk MB Reactive red (RR218) 298 1.8232 26.44 82.57 Değermenci et al. (2019)  
   308 0.9975    
   318 0.1717    
   328 −0.6540    
Corn straw composite MC Malachite green 298 −8.89 40.90 167.08 Eltaweil et al. (2020)  
   303 −9.72    
   308 −10.56    
   313 −11.39    
Corn stalk MB Direct red (DR23) 283.15 −4.793 57.481 228.29 Fathi et al. (2015)  
   288.15 −5.285    
   298.15 −6.336    
   308.15 −7.394    
   318.15 −8.120    
Corn straw MC Methylene blue 298 −9.25 −42.66 −111.37 Ge et al. (2016)  
   318 −7.75    
   338 −4.74    
Maize stover MC Methyl red 293 −5.00 7.865 0.0439 Guyo et al. (2017)  
   303 −5.44    
   313 −5.88    
   323 −46.32    
Maize husk leaf MC Malachite green 303 −5.93 32.4 127 Jalil et al. (2012)  
   313 −7.19    
   323 −8.46    
Corn cob MBC Methylene blue 313 −67.80 25.5 139.6 Jawad et al. (2018)  
   323 −69.20    
   333 −70.50    
Corn straw MB Malachite green 298 −22.4 54.4 0.03 Lima et al. (2017)  
   308 −25.5    
   318 −26.9    
   328 −30.6    
Corn straw MB Malachite green 298 −22.4 63.8 0.03 Lima et al. (2017)  
   308 −26.3    
   318 −28.5    
   328 −31.3    
Corn straw core MB Methylene blue 298 −1.67 −29.95 −87.56 Liu et al. (2018b)  
   318 −0.55    
   338 1.88    
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue 293 −26.8 9.5 124 Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
   313 −28.9    
   333 −31.8    
Corn stalk MB Malachite green 293 −26.3 11.8 130 Soldatkina & Yanar (2021)  
   313 −28.6    
   333 −31.5    
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet 298.15 −16.549 1.50 0.15 Mittal et al. (2018)  
   308.15 −17.873    
   318.15 −19.558    
Corn cob MAC Methylene blue 293 −7.616 37.442 153.783 Miyah et al. (2016)  
   303 −9.154    
   313 −10.692    
   323 −12.221    
Corn cob MAC Congo red 303 −32.27 −20.91 0.064 Ojedokun & Bello (2017)  
   313 −34.46    
   323 −35.76    
Corn husk MC Methylene blue 300 −1.16 18.1 64 Guin et al. (2018)  
   310 −1.74    
   320 −2.38    
Corn husk MB Methylene blue 298 −6.5651 −4.3792 15.9408 Paşka et al. (2014)  
   313 −6.5755    
   333 −5.6497    
Corn straw MAC Reactive brilliant yellow 298 −7.05 1.61 29.05 Ren et al. (2020)  
   308 −7.34    
   318 −7.63    
Corn straw MAC Reactive brilliant red 298 −7.08 1.41 28.47 Ren et al. (2020)  
   308 −7.36    
   318 −7.65    
Maize cob MB Bromophenol blue 298 −5.039 −4.226 0.003 Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
   303 −5.052    
   308 −5.066    
   313 −5.079    
   318 −5.093    
Maize cob MB Bromothymol blue 298 −1.528 6.871 0.028 Abubakar & Ibrahim (2018)  
   303 −1.669    
   308 −1.810    
   313 −1.951    
   318 −2.092    
Corn cob leaves MB Basic violet 4 303 −12.57 −14.43 −0.0061 Sepúlveda et al. (2015)  
   318 −12.47    
   333 −12.38    
Corn stalk MB Acidic red 303 −30.2 −9.0 70 Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
   318 −31.3    
   328 −31.9    
Corn stalk MB Acidic orange 303 −30.0 −14.0 53 Soldatkina & Zavrichko (2018)  
   318 −31.2    
   328 −31.3    
Maize cob MBC Methylene blue 298 −1.44 −11.908 −0.037 Tsamo et al. (2019)  
   303 0.23    
   318 −0.36    
   333 0.41    
Corn stalk MC Methylene blue 303.15 −4.956 −21.471 −0.054 Wen et al. (2018)  
   313.15 −4.454    
   323.15 −3.817    
   333.15 −3.353    
Corn cover MC Alizarin red S 298 −1.51 −2.81 −4.6 Zolgharnein et al. (2016)  
Corn stover MC Indigo carmine 288 −23,485 2.914 491.4 Ahmad et al. (2021)  
   298 −26,770    
   308 −28,478    
   318 −29,572    

The physical adsorption compelled by the mode of energy interactive process, e.g., hydrogen bonding, van der Waals, and ℼ–ℼ interface between the adsorbent and dye pollutant, is dependent on the Gibbs free energy (ΔGo) (Chang et al. 2021). A combination of negative values (ΔGo < 0) and positive values (ΔGo > 0) of Gibbs free energy at stated temperatures depicting spontaneity and non-spontaneity of chemical reactions was reported in Table 5 for several grades of adsorbent class and dye adsorbate species. The reduction in ΔGo values with increasing temperatures of solution confirms the feasibility of thermodynamics, and the adsorption of anionic and cationic dyes is favourable at high temperatures (Chang et al. 2021). According to Ahmad et al. (2021), at increased temperature, the adsorbent pores get enlarged, subsequently initiating further activation of surface sites, leading to a decrease in ΔGo. On the contrary, Wen et al. (2018) reported a rise in negative values of ΔGo at decreased temperatures that recorded advantageous adsorption processes, and this could be enhanced mobility of the cationic dye at higher temperatures, thereby producing lower adsorption capacity. The positive and negative values of ΔHo observed in Table 5 show that the sorption mechanism is either endothermic or exothermic in nature, in corroboration with the effect of temperature. The exothermic reaction from dye biosorption onto the maize biomass surface site also indicates the existence of a chemical interaction between the adsorbing species and the adsorbate, whereas in the case of the endothermic process, the biosorption is physisorption, indicating a weak interaction between the maize biomass and dye types (Mbarki et al. 2018). The positive values of ΔHo observed in the reviewed literature could be due to probable structural deformation and inducement of a photocatalytic effect by specific functional groups of the maize biomass adsorbent in the adsorption system (Chang et al. 2021).

Entropy change (ΔSo) is a parameter for evaluating the magnitude of irregularity between the adsorbate molecules and the adsorbent. The positive value of ΔSo for the adsorption dyes on different active sites of the adsorbent class designates a rise in sorption randomness, and the attraction of the adsorbent for the dye molecules was high (Soldatkina & Zavrichko 2018). The increase in randomness at the solid–solution interface throughout the adsorption process is indicated by the positive change in entropy values in several prior studies (Table 5). The kinetic energy of the adsorbate molecules rises as a result of the mobility of dye molecules on the sorbent surface site increasing with the temperature increase at positive values of entropy change. On the other hand, the negative values of ΔSo in dye adsorption on composite and improved corn straw elucidate a decrease in the degree of disorderliness between the dye molecules and corn adsorbent class (Ge et al. 2016; Liu et al. 2018b). Similar inferences were observed in the adsorption of dye species on UM cob (Sepúlveda et al. 2015), maize cob biochar (Tsamo et al. 2019), composite corn stalk (Wen et al. 2018), and composite corn cover (Zolgharnein et al. 2016), as shown in Table 5, which could be attributed to the loss of at least a degree of freedom by dye molecules when adsorbed and no occurrence of a notable change in entropy (Wen et al. 2018).

The practical utilization of any adsorbent is predicated upon its potential for use multiple times (Emenike et al. 2022c). However, not many studies have attempted to investigate the possibility of regenerating and reusing maize/corn adsorbents in the adsorption of dyes. Nevertheless, an overview of the studies that carried out this is presented in Table 6. There were significant variations in desorption of the dyes. There were cases where the regeneration efficiencies were higher than 100% after two desorptions, even when the use of two different eluents (NaCl and HCl) was employed. In the study, this observation was attributed to a possible reaction between the lone pair of electrons on the adsorbent and the H+ on the HCl eluent, thus leading to the availability of more reaction sites for the removal of dyes (Song et al. 2016). In some instances, the use of the same eluent exhibited varying regeneration efficiencies, although they were used in the removal of different dyes. Similarly, while some adsorbents performed over long, repeated cycles, others could only be reused once. Hence, it suffices to say that the regenerative efficiency of an adsorbent would depend on the adsorbent type (unmodified or modified), the eluent used, and the pollutant to be removed from the environmental matrix.

Table 6

Desorption/reuse studies for dye uptake by maize/corn adsorbents

Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeEluentNumber of cycles (n)% desorbed (n = 1)% qm retained after n cyclesReferences
Corn stalk MAC Methylene blue Deionized water 75 – Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Corn stalk MAC Malachite green – 90.2 33.65 Kang et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MAC Methylene blue Acetone 20 100 – Mittal et al. (2020)  
Corn stalk MC Methyl orange NaCl – – Song et al. (2016)  
Corn cob MBC Methyl orange – > 99 – Zhang et al. (2020)  
Corn starch MC Golden yellow X-GL Ethanol ≤ 85 – Guo et al. (2019)  
Corn straw MC Methylene blue Hydrochloric acid 80.6 – Liu et al. (2020b)  
Corn fibers MB Alcian blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Methylene blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Coomassie brilliant blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Neutral red Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 NaOH – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 NaCl – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 KOH – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 Ethanol – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 hexane – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Deionized water ≤ 5 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Hydrochloric acid ≤ 70 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Ethanol ≤ 30 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue NaOH ≤ 5 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn straw MC Methylene blue Ethanol 70–90 – Zhao et al. (2014)  
Corn cob MB Gentian violet KOH – 92.5 – Javed et al. (2021)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeEluentNumber of cycles (n)% desorbed (n = 1)% qm retained after n cyclesReferences
Corn stalk MAC Methylene blue Deionized water 75 – Mousavi et al. (2020)  
Corn stalk MAC Malachite green – 90.2 33.65 Kang et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MAC Methylene blue Acetone 20 100 – Mittal et al. (2020)  
Corn stalk MC Methyl orange NaCl – – Song et al. (2016)  
Corn cob MBC Methyl orange – > 99 – Zhang et al. (2020)  
Corn starch MC Golden yellow X-GL Ethanol ≤ 85 – Guo et al. (2019)  
Corn straw MC Methylene blue Hydrochloric acid 80.6 – Liu et al. (2020b)  
Corn fibers MB Alcian blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Methylene blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Coomassie brilliant blue Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn fibers MB Neutral red Acid and alkali solutions 96 – Mallampati et al. (2015)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 NaOH – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 NaCl – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 KOH – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 Ethanol – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn stover MC Reactive red 141 hexane – < 12 – Carijo et al. (2019)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Deionized water ≤ 5 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Hydrochloric acid ≤ 70 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue Ethanol ≤ 30 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn pericarp MB Methylene blue NaOH ≤ 5 – Rosas-Castor et al. (2014)  
Corn straw MC Methylene blue Ethanol 70–90 – Zhao et al. (2014)  
Corn cob MB Gentian violet KOH – 92.5 – Javed et al. (2021)  
Table 7

Competitive adsorption study for dye uptake by maize/corn adsorbents

Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeCompeting speciesConcentration of competing speciesMaximum change with competing speciesReferences
Corn stigmata MB Methylene blue NaCl 1,000 mM 27.76% decrease Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Corn stigmata MB Indigo carmine NaCl 1,000 mM 83.74% decrease Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet CaCl 0.6 M 23% decrease Mittal et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet NaCl 0.6 M 20.5% decrease Mittal et al. (2018)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue H+ 0.02 mol/L 71% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue K+ 0.04 mol/L 16% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue K+ 0.030 mol/L 35.71% decrease Tang et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue Ca2+ 0.030 mol/L 85.71% decrease Tang et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk pith MB Crystal violet NaCl 0.02 mol/L 30.65% decrease Peng et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk pith MB Methylene blue NaCl 0.02 mol/L 57.58% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  
Plant partsAdsorbent classDyeCompeting speciesConcentration of competing speciesMaximum change with competing speciesReferences
Corn stigmata MB Methylene blue NaCl 1,000 mM 27.76% decrease Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Corn stigmata MB Indigo carmine NaCl 1,000 mM 83.74% decrease Mbarki et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet CaCl 0.6 M 23% decrease Mittal et al. (2018)  
Corn starch MBC Methylene violet NaCl 0.6 M 20.5% decrease Mittal et al. (2018)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue H+ 0.02 mol/L 71% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue K+ 0.04 mol/L 16% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue K+ 0.030 mol/L 35.71% decrease Tang et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk MB Methylene blue Ca2+ 0.030 mol/L 85.71% decrease Tang et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk pith MB Crystal violet NaCl 0.02 mol/L 30.65% decrease Peng et al. (2021)  
Corn stalk pith MB Methylene blue NaCl 0.02 mol/L 57.58% decrease Tang et al. (2019)  

Competitive adsorption explains the level of adsorbent attraction to the dye adsorbate ions in the presence of other existing competing chemical ions in aqueous media. In some textile industries, several electrolytes are added to the dye solution to increase the dye's fastness on the fabrics, thereby accumulating inorganic salts in the effluents that may disrupt the adsorption performance at given concentrations (Peng et al. 2021). Again, the nature of modified or activated biosorbent can introduce coexisting ions during the sorption process, which can compete with dye contaminants for the sorption sites, which may either increase or decrease the ionic strength. The effect of ionic strength on the adsorption tendency of corn stigmata biomass for cationic (methylene blue) and anionic (indigo carmine) dyes was analysed using NaCl solution at varying concentrations of 10, 100, and 1,000 mM (Mbarki et al. 2018). It was observed that the adsorption capacity of methylene blue decreased from 8.267 to 5.972 mg/g and from 8.036 to 1.307 mg/g for indigo carmine at increased concentrations. The positive effect of the salt on the decreased biosorption capacity of methylene blue dye could be due to the competitive interaction between Na+ and cationic dye on the biomass negative surface sites. In addition, the impact of Cl of salt on the adsorption of indigo carmine follows similar competition between the chloride ion and anionic dye, SO3, on the modified sorbent attracting sites.

The adsorption behaviour of a magnetic carbonaceous-prepared adsorbent from corn starch in dye aqueous solutions comprising NaCl and CaCl2 was investigated to evaluate the binding interaction between the carbonized adsorbent and methylene violet dye (Mittal et al. 2018). A decrease in efficiency of adsorption was observed with increasing concentrations of cations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 M) in the dye solution, which depicts possible competitive electrostatic contacts between the cationic dye molecules and cations (Na+ and Ca2+) on the negatively charged binding sites of the carbonaceous adsorbent material. The existence of Ca2+ in the organic dye solution reduces the adsorption capacity more effectively than Na+ as a result of the smaller hydrated radius of the calcium ion, which aids its mobility in an aqueous solution and has a stronger competing tendency than monovalent ions. Furthermore, the result of coexisting cations (H+ and K+) on the sorption performance of H3PO4-modified corn stalk for methylene blue dye was reported by Tang et al. (2019). The uptake efficiency of methylene blue by the modified adsorbent decreased in the presence of increasing H+ and K+ ion concentrations, which showed that partial displacement and ion exchange were involved during the adsorption mechanism. H+ displayed lower adsorption capacity owing to higher attraction to adsorption sites with a reduced hydrated radius (2.83 Å) than K+, and hence, the driving force for the uptake was highly involved. Tang et al. (2021) reported on the competing effect of varying concentrations of K+ and Ca2+ on the adsorption capacity of carboxylate-modified corn stalk for methylene blue dye. The adsorption capacity values of methylene blue were reduced in the presence of K+ and Ca2+ ions with concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.03 mol/L, (Table 7) thus indicating competition with the organic dye-attracting active site on the treated adsorbent. The competing behaviour of Ca2+ decreased the removal efficiency of dye pollutants compared to K+ as a result of the smaller ionic radius of Ca2+, which constitutes a driving force for easier attraction of the sorption sites. The study further stated that the cations competed with the dye at lower coexisting concentrations, generating a highly decreased range of adsorption capacity, whereas at increasing concentrations, the electrostatic connections between the dye molecule and the surface sites are being inhibited by K+ and Ca2+. The effect of inorganic anions (Cl, NO2, NO3, SO42−, and HPO42−) on the removal performance of cationic dyes (methylene blue and crystal violet) on corn pith biosorbent at concentrations of 0.05 M was evaluated (Peng et al. 2021). It was noted that the sorption efficiency for single and binary cationic dye molecule solutions was somewhat reduced in the presence of varied sodium salts. The status of adsorption inhibition by the anions in a single methylene blue dye aqueous solution follows this order: SO42− > HPO42− > Cl > NO2 > NO3, showing stronger competition of divalent electrolytes (Na2SO4 and Na2HPO4) with the dye molecules for limited adsorption sites than monovalent anions. The adsorption capacity of corn pith biosorbent decreased considerably for both sole and binary dye solutions, with a reduction in ionic strength at increased salt concentrations. This is due to the incessant competing electrostatic interaction that existed between Na+ and dye molecules for activated active sites, leading to an increased inhibitory effect on dye removal. In general, the reduction in sorption efficiency of maize biomass for organic dyes is a result of the compressibility of the adsorbent double layer caused by increased ionic strength, thus reducing the electrostatic attraction between the pollutant species and prepared corn biomass.

The adsorption behaviour of a variety of dyes on corn/maize-based materials was reviewed in this study. From the available data, the most utilized corn biomass was cob, stalk, and straw, followed by husk, silk, and leaves. The adsorbents were grouped into four classes, namely, biosorbents, activated carbons, biochar, and composites. All the forms of corn/maize-based adsorbents exhibited high adsorption performance relative to the pre-treated precursor. This was due to the development of porous structure, functionality, and elemental composition in the modified or treated material. In particular, corn/maize-based composites and activated carbon adsorbents showed high surface areas with favourable functionality, which improved adsorbent's efficacy. The maximum uptake of dye was 1,682 mg/g for methylene blue using corn husk-based composite adsorbent, followed by Rhodamine B (using corn/maize-based activated carbon) with an adsorption capacity of 1,578 mg/g. Freundlich and pseudo-second-order models best represented the isotherm and kinetic data of the adsorbents for a variety of dyes. Freundlich and PFO models were also applicable in some studies. The parameters of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models confirm the favourable adsorption nature. The main mechanisms for studied adsorption systems involve electrostatic attraction, ion exchange, and hydrogen bonding, along with complexation, pore filling, and π–π interaction. Thermodynamic results confirm spontaneous, endothermic/exothermic, and feasible adsorption natures.

Corn/maize-based materials were extensively addressed in the literature as highly efficient adsorbents for aquatic contaminants. Nevertheless, some points still need to be considered. Futuristic studies should consider applying two or more corn residues as precursors for adsorbent production. In addition, studies should also include the optimization of preparation variables for the corn/maize materials. There is also a need to test the behaviour of binary or multiple dye adsorbate systems as obtained in industrial wastewaters. Also, identifying the efficiency of corn-based materials for eliminating actual effluents in a continuous adsorption unit could be delved into. Furthermore, there is a need for cost analysis studies. Cost is an important factor in the choice of an adsorbent for industry. Cost analysis studies will not only help industries make informed and feasible decisions but also help futuristic works in this field of study and allow for comparison with commercial adsorbents.

This article does not contain any studies involving human or animal subjects.

There was no external funding for the study.

Kingsley O. Iwuozor: conceptualization, methodology, data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Chisom T. Umeh: data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Stephen Sunday Emmanuel: data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Ebuka Chizitere Emenike: methodology, data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Abel U. Egbemhenghe: writing – original draft and writing – review & editing. Odunayo T. Ore: writing – original draft and writing – review and editing. Taiwo Temitayo Micheal: data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Fredrick O. Omoarukhe: writing – original draft; writing – review & editing. Patience A. Sagboye; data curation, writing – original draft, writing – review and editing, validation. Victor E. Ojukwu: writing – original draft and writing – review and editing. Adewale George Adeniyi: conceptualization, methodology, writing – original draft; writing – review and editing, validation, supervision, project administration.

All relevant data are included in the paper or its Supplementary Information.

The authors declare there is no conflict.

Abdel-Aal
S.
,
Gad
Y.
&
Dessouki
A.
2006
Use of rice straw and radiation-modified maize starch/acrylonitrile in the treatment of wastewater
.
Journal of Hazardous Materials
129
(
1–3
),
204
215
.
Abdelwahab
O.
2008
Evaluation of the use of loofa activated carbons as potential adsorbents for aqueous solutions containing dye
.
Desalination
222
(
1
),
357
367
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.desal.2007.01.146
.
Abdullah
N. H.
,
Ghani
N. A. A.
,
Razab
M. K. A. A.
,
Noor
A. a. M.
,
Halim
A. Z. A.
,
Rasat
M. S. M.
,
Wong
K. N. S. W. S.
&
Amin
M. F. M.
2019
Methyl orange adsorption from aqueous solution by corn cob based activated carbon
. In:
AIP Conference Proceedings
.
18–19 August, 2018, Kelantan, Malaysia
.
AIP Publishing LLC
.
Abubakar
S. I.
&
Ibrahim
M. B.
2018
Adsorption of bromophenol blue and bromothymol blue dyes onto raw maize cob
.
Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences
11
(
1
),
273
281
.
Adeniyi
A. G.
,
Emenike
E. C.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Okoro
H. K.
&
Ige
O. O.
2022
Acid mine drainage: The footprint of the Nigeria mining industry
.
Chemistry Africa
5
,
1907
1920
.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s42250-022-00493-3
.
Ali
A. F.
,
Kovo
A. S.
&
Adetunji
S. A.
2017
Methylene blue and brilliant green dyes removal from aqueous solution using agricultural wastes activated carbon
.
Journal of Encapsulation and Adsorption Sciences
7
(
2
),
95
107
.
Ali
F.
,
Ali
N.
,
Bibi
I.
,
Said
A.
,
Nawaz
S.
,
Ali
Z.
,
Salman
S. M.
,
Iqbal
H. M.
&
Bilal
M.
2020
Adsorption isotherm, kinetics and thermodynamic of acid blue and basic blue dyes onto activated charcoal
.
Case Studies in Chemical and Environmental Engineering
2
,
100040
.
Aljeboree
A. M.
&
Alkaim
A. F.
2019
Comparative removal of three textile dyes from aqueous solutions by adsorption: As a model (corn-cob source waste) of plants role in environmental enhancement
.
Plant Archives
19
(
1
),
1613
1620
.
Aljeboree
A. M.
,
Hussein
F. H.
&
Alkaim
A. F.
2019
Removal of textile dye (methylene blue MB) from aqueous solution by activated carbon as a model (corn-cob source waste of plant): As a model of environmental enhancement
.
Plant Archives
19
(
2
),
906
909
.
Aljeboree
A. M.
,
Al-Baitai
A. Y.
,
Abdalhadi
S. M.
&
Alkaim
A. F.
2021
Investigation study of removing methyl violet dye from aqueous solutions using corn-cob as a source of activated carbon
.
Egyptian Journal of Chemistry
64
(
6
),
2873
2878
.
Al-Swaidan
H. M.
&
Ahmad
A.
2011
Synthesis and characterization of activated carbon from Saudi Arabian dates tree's fronds wastes
.
In 3rd International Conference on Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, 23–25 September, 2011, Singapore
.
Arquilada
A. M.
,
Ilano
C. J.
,
Pineda
P.
,
Felicita
J. M.
&
Cid-Andres
A.
2018
Adsorption studies of heavy metals and dyes using corn cob: A review
.
Global Scientific Journals
6
(
12
),
343
376
.
Assirey
E. A.
&
Altamimi
L. R.
2021
Chemical analysis of corn cob-based biochar and its role as water decontaminants
.
Journal of Taibah University for Science
15
(
1
),
111
121
.
Balathanigaimani
M.
,
Shim
W.-G.
,
Park
K. H.
,
Lee
J.-W.
&
Moon
H.
2009
Effects of structural and surface energetic heterogeneity properties of novel corn grain-based activated carbons on dye adsorption
.
Microporous and Mesoporous Materials
118
(
1–3
),
232
238
.
Bello
O. S.
&
Ahmad
M. A.
2011
Adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using chemical activated mango peels
. In:
2nd International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (ICEST), September, 2016, Belgrade, Serbia
.
Billa
S. F.
,
Angwafo
T. E.
&
Ngome
A. F.
2019
Agro-environmental characterization of biochar issued from crop wastes in the humid forest zone of Cameroon
.
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture
8
(
1
),
1
13
.
Budinova
T.
,
Ekinci
E.
,
Yardim
F.
,
Grimm
A.
,
Björnbom
E.
,
Minkova
V.
&
Goranova
M.
2006
Characterization and application of activated carbon produced by H3PO4 and water vapor activation
.
Fuel Processing Technology
87
(
10
),
899
905
.
Campbell
Q.
,
Bunt
J.
,
Kasaini
H.
&
Kruger
D.
2012
The preparation of activated carbon from South African coal
.
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
112
(
1
),
37
44
.
Campos
N. F.
,
Guedes
G. A.
,
Oliveira
L. P.
,
Gama
B. M.
,
Sales
D. C.
,
Rodriguez-Diaz
J. M.
,
Barbosa
C. M.
&
Duarte
M. M.
2020
Competitive adsorption between Cu2+ and Ni2+ on corn cob activated carbon and the difference of thermal effects on mono and bicomponent systems
.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
8
(
5
),
104232
.
Carijo
P. M.
,
Dos Reis
G. S.
,
Lima
É. C.
,
Oliveira
M. L.
&
Dotto
G. L.
2019
Functionalization of corn stover with 3-aminopropyltrietoxysilane to uptake reactive Red 141 from aqueous solutions
.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research
26
(
31
),
32198
32208
.
Chang
B. P.
,
Gupta
A.
&
Mekonnen
T. H.
2021
Flame synthesis of carbon nanoparticles from corn oil as a highly effective cationic dye adsorbent
.
Chemosphere
282
,
131062
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.131062
.
Chen
S.
,
Chen
G.
,
Chen
H.
,
Sun
Y.
,
Yu
X.
,
Su
Y.
&
Tang
S.
2019
Preparation of porous carbon-based material from corn straw via mixed alkali and its application for removal of dye
.
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects
568
,
173
183
.
Crini
G.
,
Lichtfouse
E.
,
Wilson
L. D.
&
Morin-Crini
N.
2019
Conventional and non-conventional adsorbents for wastewater treatment
.
Environmental Chemistry Letters
17
(
1
),
195
213
.
doi:10.1007/s10311-018-0786-8
.
Cruz
G.
,
Pirilä
M.
,
Huuhtanen
M.
,
Carrión
L.
,
Alvarenga
E.
&
Keiski
R. L.
2012
Production of activated carbon from cocoa (Theobroma cacao) pod husk
.
Journal of Civil and Environmental Engineering
2
(
2
),
1
6
.
Dada
A. O.
,
Inyinbor
A.
&
Oluyori
A.
2012
Comparative adsorption of dyes unto activated carbon prepared from maize stems and sugar cane stems
.
Comparative Adsorption of Dyes Unto Activated Carbon Prepared From Maize Stems and Sugar Cane Stems
2
(
3
),
38
43
.
Danish
M.
,
Hashim
R.
,
Ibrahim
M. M.
,
Rafatullah
M.
,
Ahmad
T.
&
Sulaiman
O.
2011
Characterization of Acacia mangium wood based activated carbons prepared in the presence of basic activating agents
.
BioResources
6
(
3
),
3019
3033
.
Değermenci
G. D.
,
Değermenci
N.
,
Ayvaoğlu
V.
,
Durmaz
E.
,
Çakır
D.
&
Akan
E.
2019
Adsorption of reactive dyes on lignocellulosic waste; characterization, equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies
.
Journal of Cleaner Production
225
,
1220
1229
.
Dehkhoda
A. M.
,
Ellis
N.
&
Gyenge
E.
2016
Effect of activated biochar porous structure on the capacitive deionization of NaCl and zncl2 solutions
.
Microporous and Mesoporous Materials
224
,
217
228
.
Dehvari
M.
,
Ghaneian
M. T.
,
Fallah
F.
,
Sahraee
M.
&
Jamshidi
B.
2013
Evaluation of maize tassel powder efficiency in removal of reactive red 198 dye from synthetic textile wastewater
.
Journal of Community Health Research
1(
3
),
153
165
.
Dina
D.
,
Ntieche
A.
,
Ndi
J.
&
Ketcha Mbadcam
J.
2012
Adsorption of acetic acid onto activated carbons obtained from maize cobs by chemical activation with zinc chloride (ZnCl2)
.
Research Journal of Chemical Sciences
2231
,
606X
.
Duru
C. E.
&
Duru
I. A.
2017
Adsorption capacity of maize biomass parts in the remediation of Cu2+ ion polluted water
.
World News of Natural Sciences
12
,
51
62
.
Duru
C.
,
Duru
I.
,
Ogbonna
C.
,
Enedoh
M.
&
Emele
P.
2019
Adsorption of copper ions from aqueous solution onto natural and pretreated maize husk: Adsorption efficiency and kinetic studies
.
Journal of Chemical Society of Nigeria
44
(
5
),
798
803
.
Ekpete
O.
&
Horsfall
M.
2011
Preparation and characterization of activated carbon derived from fluted pumpkin stem waste (Telfairia occidentalis Hook F)
.
Research Journal of Chemical Sciences
1
(
3
),
10
17
.
El-Sayed
G. O.
,
Yehia
M. M.
&
Asaad
A. A.
2014
Assessment of activated carbon prepared from corncob by chemical activation with phosphoric acid
.
Water Resources and Industry
7
,
66
75
.
Emenike
E. C.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
&
Anidiobi
S. U.
2021
Heavy metal pollution in aquaculture: Sources, impacts and mitigation techniques
.
Biological Trace Element Research
200
,
4476
4492
.
Emenike
E. C.
,
Adeniyi
A. G.
,
Omuku
P. E.
,
Okwu
K. C.
&
Iwuozor
K. O.
2022a
Recent advances in nano-adsorbents for the sequestration of copper from water
.
Journal of Water Process Engineering
47
,
102715
.
Emenike
E. C.
,
Ogunniyi
S.
,
Ighalo
J. O.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Okoro
H. K.
&
Adeniyi
A. G.
2022b
Delonix regia biochar potential in removing phenol from industrial wastewater
.
Bioresource Technology Reports
19
,
101195
.
Emenike
E. C.
,
Adeleke
J.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Ogunniyi
S.
,
Adeyanju
C. A.
,
Amusa
V. T.
,
Okoro
H. K.
&
Adeniyi
A. G.
2022c
Adsorption of crude oil from aqueous solution: A review
.
Journal of Water Process Engineering
50
,
103330
.
Emenike
E. C.
,
Adeniyi
A. G.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Okorie
C. J.
,
Egbemhenghe
A. U.
,
Omuku
P. E.
,
Okwu
K. C.
&
Saliu
O. D.
2023
A critical review on the removal of mercury (Hg2+) from aqueous solution using nanoadsorbents
.
Environmental Nanotechnology, Monitoring & Management
20
,
100816
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enmm.2023.100816
.
Emmanuel
S. S.
,
Adesibikan
A. A.
&
Saliu
O. D.
2023a
Phytogenically bioengineered metal nanoarchitecture for degradation of refractory dye water pollutants: A pragmatic minireview
.
Applied Organometallic Chemistry
37
(
2
),
e6946
.
https://doi.org/10.1002/aoc.6946
.
Emmanuel
S. S.
,
Adesibikan
A. A.
,
Saliu
O. D.
&
Opatola
E. A.
2023b
Greenly biosynthesized bimetallic nanoparticles for ecofriendly degradation of notorious dye pollutants: A review
.
Plant Nano Biology
3
,
100024
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plana.2023.100024
.
Fadhel
O. H.
,
Eisa
M. Y.
&
Zair
Z. R.
2021
Decolorizing of malachite green dye by adsorption using corn leaves as adsorbent material
.
Journal of Engineering
27
(
2
),
1
12
.
Fadhil
O. H. F. H.
,
Eisa
M. Y.
,
Salih
D. A.
&
Nafeaa
Z. R.
2021
Adsorption of Indigo Carmen dye by using corn leaves as natural adsorbent material
.
Al-Khwarizmi Engineering Journal
17
(
1
),
43
50
.
Farnane
M.
,
Tounsadi
H.
,
Machrouhi
A.
,
Elhalil
A.
,
Mahjoubi
F.
,
Sadiq
M.
,
Abdennouri
M.
,
Qourzal
S.
&
Barka
N.
2018
Dye removal from aqueous solution by raw maize corncob and H3PO4 activated maize corncob
.
Journal of Water Reuse and Desalination
8
(
2
),
214
224
.
Fathi
M.
,
Asfaram
A.
&
Farhangi
A.
2015
Removal of Direct Red 23 from aqueous solution using corn stalks: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies
.
Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy
135
,
364
372
.
Fatoye
E.
&
Onigbinde
M.
2020
Dye adsorption with sugarcane bagasse and corn cob
.
SAU Science-Tech Journal
5
(
1
),
182
193
.
Freundlich
H.
1906
Over the adsorption in solution
.
The Journal of Physical Chemistry
57
(
385471
),
1100
1107
.
Gao
Y.
,
Zhang
J.
,
Chen
C.
,
Du
Y.
,
Teng
G.
&
Wu
Z.
2021
Functional biochar fabricated from waste red mud and corn straw in China for acidic dye wastewater treatment
.
Journal of Cleaner Production
320
,
128887
.
Ghasemi
S. M.
,
Mohseni-Bandpei
A.
,
Ghaderpoori
M.
,
Fakhri
Y.
,
Keramati
H.
,
Taghavi
M.
,
Moradi
B.
&
Karimyan
K.
2017
Application of modified maize hull for removal of Cu (II) ions from aqueous solutions
.
Environment Protection Engineering
43
(
4
),
93
103
.
Günay
A.
,
Arslankaya
E.
&
Tosun
I.
2007
Lead removal from aqueous solution by natural and pretreated clinoptilolite: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics
.
Journal of Hazardous Materials
146
(
1–2
),
362
371
.
Guo
H.
,
Zhang
S.
,
Kou
Z.
,
Zhai
S.
,
Ma
W.
&
Yang
Y.
2015a
Removal of cadmium (II) from aqueous solutions by chemically modified maize straw
.
Carbohydrate Polymers
115
,
177
185
.
Guo
L.
,
Liu
R.
,
Li
X.
,
Sun
Y.
&
Du
X.
2015b
The physical and adsorption properties of different modified corn starches
.
Starch-Stärke
67
(
3–4
),
237
246
.
Guo
X.
,
Yin
Y.
,
Yang
C.
&
Dang
Z.
2018
Maize straw decorated with sulfide for tylosin removal from the water
.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
152
,
16
23
.
Guyo
U.
,
Mhonyera
J.
&
Moyo
M.
2015
Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solutions by raw and treated biomass of maize stover–a comparative study
.
Process Safety and Environmental Protection
93
,
192
200
.
Guyo
U.
,
Matewere
N.
,
Matina
K.
,
Nharingo
T.
&
Moyo
M.
2017
Fabrication of a sustainable maize stover-graft-methyl methacrylate biopolymer for remediation of methyl red contaminated wasters
.
Sustainable Materials and Technologies
13
,
9
17
.
Hirunpraditkoon
S.
,
Tunthong
N.
,
Ruangchai
A.
&
Nuithitikul
K.
2011
Adsorption capacities of activated carbons prepared from bamboo by KOH activation
.
International Journal of Chemical and Molecular Engineering
5
(
6
),
491
495
.
Ismail
S. N. A. S.
,
Rahman
W. A.
,
Rahim
N. A. A.
,
Masdar
N. D.
&
Kamal
M. L.
2018
Adsorption of malachite green dye from aqueous solution using corn cob
. In
AIP Conference Proceedings
.
AIP Publishing LLC
,
17–18 April, 2018, Penang, Malaysia. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5066992
.
Ismail
M.
,
Fadzil
M.
,
Rosmadi
N.
,
Razali
N.
&
Daud
A. M.
2019
Acid treated corn stalk adsorbent for removal of alizarin yellow dye in wastewater
. In
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
.
IOP Publishing
,
August, 2019, Penang Island, Malaysia
.
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Akpomie
K. G.
,
Conradie
J.
,
Adegoke
K. A.
,
Oyedotun
K. O.
,
Ighalo
J. O.
,
Amaku
J. F.
,
Olisah
C.
&
Adeola
A. O.
2022a
Aqueous phase adsorption of aromatic organoarsenic compounds: A review
.
Journal of Water Process Engineering
49
,
103059
.
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Emenike
E. C.
,
Aniagor
C. O.
,
Iwuchukwu
F. U.
,
Ibitogbe
E. M.
,
Temitayo
O. B.
,
Omuku
P. E.
&
Adeniyi
A. G.
2022b
Removal of pollutants from aqueous media using cow dung-based adsorbents
.
Current Research in Green and Sustainable Chemistry
5
,
100300
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crgsc.2022.100300
.
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Oyekunle
I. P.
,
Emenike
E. C.
,
Okoye-Anigbogu
S. M.
,
Ibitogbe
E. M.
,
Elemile
O.
,
Ighalo
J. O.
&
Adeniyi
A. G.
2022c
An overview of equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies for the sequestration of Maxilon dyes
.
Cleaner Materials
6
,
100148
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clema.2022.100148
.
Jalil
A.
,
Triwahyono
S.
,
Yaakob
M.
,
Azmi
Z.
,
Sapawe
N.
,
Kamarudin
N.
,
Setiabudi
H.
,
Jaafar
N.
,
Sidik
S.
&
Adam
S.
2012
Utilization of bivalve shell-treated Zea mays L. (maize) husk leaf as a low-cost biosorbent for enhanced adsorption of malachite green
.
Bioresource Technology
120
,
218
224
.
Jassim
A.
,
Amlah
L.
,
Ali
D.
&
Aljabar
A.
2012
Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from Iraqi apricot stones
.
Canadian Journal on Chemical Engineering & Technology
3
,
60
65
.
Jawad
A. H.
,
Mohammed
S. A.
,
Mastuli
M. S.
&
Abdullah
M. F.
2018
Carbonization of corn (Zea mays) cob agricultural residue by one-step activation with sulfuric acid for methylene blue adsorption
.
Desalination and Water Treatment
118
(
3
),
342
351
.
Jia
D.
&
Li
C.
2015
Adsorption of Pb (II) from aqueous solutions using corn straw
.
Desalination and Water Treatment
56
(
1
),
223
231
.
Jothirani
R.
,
Kumar
P. S.
,
Saravanan
A.
,
Narayan
A. S.
&
Dutta
A.
2016
Ultrasonic modified corn pith for the sequestration of dye from aqueous solution
.
Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry
39
,
162
175
.
Jun
T. Y.
,
Arumugam
S. D.
,
Latip
N. H. A.
,
Abdullah
A. M.
&
Latif
P. A.
2010
Effect of activation temperature and heating duration on physical characteristics of activated carbon prepared from agriculture waste
.
Environ. Asia
3
,
143
148
.
Kamarehie
B.
,
Jafari
A.
,
Ghaderpoori
M.
,
Amin Karami
M.
,
Mousavi
K.
&
Ghaderpoury
A.
2019
Catalytic ozonation process using PAC/γ-Fe2O3 to Alizarin Red S degradation from aqueous solutions: A batch study
.
Chemical Engineering Communications
206
(
7
),
898
908
.
Kamusoko
R.
,
Jingura
R. M.
,
Parawira
W.
&
Chikwambi
Z.
2021
Strategies for valorization of crop residues into biofuels and other value-added products
.
Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining
15
(
6
),
1950
1964
.
Kang
C.
,
Shang
D.
,
Yang
T.
,
Zhu
L.
,
Liu
F.
,
Wang
N.
&
Tian
T.
2018
Preparation of corn stalk-walnut shell mix-based activated carbon and its adsorption of malachite green
.
Chemical Research in Chinese Universities
34
(
6
),
1014
1019
.
Khodaie
M.
,
Ghasemi
N.
,
Moradi
B.
&
Rahimi
M.
2013
Removal of methylene blue from wastewater by adsorption onto zncl2 activated corn husk carbon equilibrium studies
.
Journal of Chemistry
2013
,
383985
.
https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/383985
.
Langmuir
I.
1916
The constitution and fundamental properties of solids and liquids. Part I. Solids
.
Journal of the American Chemical Society
38
(
11
),
2221
2295
.
Lara-Vásquez
E. J.
,
Solache-Ríos
M.
&
Gutiérrez-Segura
E.
2016
Malachite green dye behaviors in the presence of biosorbents from maize (Zea mays L.), their Fe-Cu nanoparticles composites and Fe-Cu nanoparticles
.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
4
(
2
),
1594
1603
.
Leelavathy
K.
,
Nageshwaran
V.
&
Bharathi
M.
2015
Comparative Study on Commercial and Corn Cobs Activated Carbon for Removal of Congo Red Dye
. In:
Applied Mechanics and Materials
.
Trans Tech Publ
. 787,
233
237
.
https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.787.233
.
Li
Y.
,
Xing
B.
,
Wang
X.
,
Wang
K.
,
Zhu
L.
&
Wang
S.
2019a
Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous biochar derived from corn stalks for phenol-enhanced adsorption
.
Energy & Fuels
33
(
12
),
12459
12468
.
Li
X.
,
Lu
X.
,
Yang
J.
,
Ju
Z.
,
Kang
Y.
,
Xu
J.
&
Zhang
S.
2019b
A facile ionic liquid approach to prepare cellulose-rich aerogels directly from corn stalks
.
Green Chemistry
21
(
10
),
2699
2708
.
Lima
D. R.
,
Klein
L.
&
Dotto
G. L.
2017
Application of ultrasound modified corn straw as adsorbent for malachite green removal from synthetic and real effluents
.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research
24
(
26
),
21484
21495
.
Lima
D. R.
,
Sellaoui
L.
,
Klein
L.
,
Reis
G. S.
,
Lima
É. C.
&
Dotto
G. L.
2018
Physicochemical and thermodynamic study of malachite green adsorption on raw and modified corn straw
.
The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering
96
(
3
),
779
787
.
Lin
G.
,
Wang
S.
,
Zhang
L.
,
Hu
T.
,
Peng
J.
,
Cheng
S.
,
Fu
L.
&
Srinivasakannan
C.
2018
Selective recovery of Au (III) from aqueous solutions using 2-aminothiazole functionalized corn bract as low-cost bioadsorbent
.
Journal of Cleaner Production
196
,
1007
1015
.
Lin
G.
,
Hu
T.
,
Wang
S.
,
Xie
T.
,
Zhang
L.
,
Cheng
S.
,
Fu
L.
&
Xiong
C.
2019
Selective removal behavior and mechanism of trace Hg (II) using modified corn husk leaves
.
Chemosphere
225
,
65
72
.
Liu
S.
,
Ge
H.
,
Cheng
S.
&
Zou
Y.
2018b
Green synthesis of magnetic 3D bio-adsorbent by corn straw core and chitosan for methylene blue removal
.
Environmental Technology
41
(
16
),
2109
2121
.
https://doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2018.1556345
.
Loya-González
D.
,
Loredo-Cancino
M.
,
Soto-Regalado
E.
,
Rivas-García
P.
,
de Jesús Cerino-Córdova
F.
,
García-Reyes
R. B.
,
Bustos-Martínez
D.
&
Estrada-Baltazar
A.
2019
Optimal activated carbon production from corn pericarp: A life cycle assessment approach
.
Journal of Cleaner Production
219
,
316
325
.
Maghri
I.
,
Amegrissi
F.
,
Elkouali
M.
,
Kenz
A.
,
Tanane
O.
,
Talbi
M.
&
Salouhi
M.
2012
Comparison of adsorption of dye onto low-cost adsorbents
.
Global Journal of Science Frontier Research Chemistry
12
(
4
),
1
6
.
Malik
D.
,
Jain
C.
,
Yadav
A.
,
Kothari
R.
&
Pathak
V.
2016
Removal of methylene blue dye in aqueous solution by agricultural waste
.
International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology
3
(
7
),
864
880
.
Mallampati
R.
,
Tan
K. S.
&
Valiyaveettil
S.
2015
Utilization of corn fibers and luffa peels for extraction of pollutants from water
.
International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation
103
,
8
15
.
Manzoor
Q.
,
Sajid
A.
,
Hussain
T.
,
Iqbal
M.
,
Abbas
M.
&
Nisar
J.
2019
Efficiency of immobilized Zea mays biomass for the adsorption of chromium from simulated media and tannery wastewater
.
Journal of Materials Research and Technology
8
(
1
),
75
86
.
Medhat
A.
,
El-Maghrabi
H. H.
,
Abdelghany
A.
,
Menem
N. M. A.
,
Raynaud
P.
,
Moustafa
Y. M.
,
Elsayed
M. A.
&
Nada
A. A.
2021
Efficiently activated carbons from corn cob for methylene blue adsorption
.
Applied Surface Science Advances
3
,
100037
.
Miraboutalebi
S. M.
,
Nikouzad
S. K.
,
Peydayesh
M.
,
Allahgholi
N.
,
Vafajoo
L.
&
McKay
G.
2017
Methylene blue adsorption via maize silk powder: Kinetic, equilibrium, thermodynamic studies and residual error analysis
.
Process Safety and Environmental Protection
106
,
191
202
.
Mittal
H.
,
Alhassan
S. M.
&
Ray
S. S.
2018
Efficient organic dye removal from wastewater by magnetic carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from corn starch
.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
6
(
6
),
7119
7131
.
Miyah
Y.
,
Lahrichi
A.
&
Idrissi
M.
2016
Removal of cationic dye—Methylene blue—from aqueous solution by adsorption onto corn cob powder calcined
.
Journal of Materials and Environmental Science
7
(
1
),
96
104
.
Mohanraj
J.
,
Durgalakshmi
D.
,
Balakumar
S.
,
Aruna
P.
,
Ganesan
S.
,
Rajendran
S.
&
Naushad
M.
2020
Low cost and quick time absorption of organic dye pollutants under ambient condition using partially exfoliated graphite
.
Journal of Water Process Engineering
34
,
101078
.
Mousavi
S. A.
,
Zangeneh
H.
,
Almasi
A.
,
Nayeri
D.
,
Monkaresi
M.
,
Mahmoudi
A.
&
Darvishi
P.
2020
Decolourization of aqueous methylene blue solutions by corn stalk: Modeling and optimization
.
Desalin. Water Treat.
197
,
335
344
.
Mousavi
S. A.
,
Kamarehie
B.
,
Almasi
A.
,
Darvishmotevalli
M.
,
Salari
M.
,
Moradnia
M.
,
Azimi
F.
,
Ghaderpoori
M.
,
Neyazi
Z.
&
Karami
M. A.
2021
Removal of Rhodamine B from aqueous solution by stalk corn activated carbon: Adsorption and kinetic study
.
Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery
13
,
7927
7936
.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s13399-021-01628-1
.
Moyo
M.
,
Chikazaza
L.
,
Nyamunda
B. C.
&
Guyo
U.
2013
Adsorption batch studies on the removal of Pb (II) using maize tassel based activated carbon
.
Journal of Chemistry
2013
,
508934
.
https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/508934
.
Mu
W.
,
Bao
D.
,
Chang
C.
&
Lian
F.
2020
Adsorption of Methyl Blue by Maize Waste Based Biochar: Adsorption Kinetics and Isotherms
. In:
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
.
IOP Publishing
.
17–18 July, 2020, Shandong, China
.
Muhammad
U. L.
,
Zango
Z. U.
&
Kadir
H. A.
2019
Crystal violet removal from aqueous solution using corn stalk biosorbent
.
Science World Journal
14
(
1
),
133
138
.
Muthusamy
P.
&
Murugan
S.
2016
Removal of lead ion using maize cob as a bioadsorbent
.
International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications
6
,
05
10
.
Nadaroğlu
H.
,
Lesani
A.
,
Soleimani
S. S.
,
Babagil
A.
&
Güngör
A.
2018
Efficient solar photocatalyst based on TiO2/corn silk NPs composite for removal of a textile azo-dye from aqueous solution
.
IIOAB J
9
(
4
),
20
27
.
Noor
A. B. M.
&
Nawi
M. A. B. M.
2008
Textural characteristics of activated carbons prepared from oil palm shells activated with zncl2 and pyrolysis under nitrogen and carbon dioxide
.
Journal of Physical Science
19
(
2
),
93
104
.
Ogura
A. P.
,
Lima
J. Z.
,
Marques
J. P.
,
Sousa
L. M.
,
Rodrigues
V. G. S.
&
Espíndola
E. L. G.
2021
A review of pesticides sorption in biochar from maize, rice, and wheat residues: Current status and challenges for soil application
.
Journal of Environmental Management
300
,
113753
.
Ohale
P. E.
,
Igwegbe
C. A.
,
Iwuozor
K. O.
,
Emenike
E. C.
,
Obi
C. C.
&
Białowiec
A.
2023
A review of the adsorption method for norfloxacin reduction from aqueous media
.
MethodsX
10
,
102180
.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2023.102180
.
Ojedokun
A. T.
&
Bello
O. S.
2017
Liquid phase adsorption of Congo red dye on functionalized corn cobs
.
Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology
38
(
9
),
1285
1294
.
Okafor
J.
,
Agbajelola
D.
,
Peter
S.
,
Adamu
M.
&
David
G.
2015
Studies on the adsorption of heavy metals in a paint industry effluent using activated maize cob
.
Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology
2
(
2
),
39
46
.
Olorundare
O.
,
Msagati
T.
,
Krause
R. W.
,
Okonkwo
J.
&
Mamba
B. B.
2014
Steam activation, characterisation and adsorption studies of activated carbon from maize tassels
.
Chemistry and Ecology
30
(
5
),
473
490
.
Omuku
P.
,
Odidika
C.
,
Ozukwe
A.
&
Iwuozor
K.
2022
A comparative evaluation of rain water obtained from corrugated roofing sheets within Awka Metropolis, Anambra State
.
Iranian (Iranica) Journal of Energy & Environment
13
(
2
),
134
140
.
Ong
S. T.
,
Gan
H. Y.
&
Leow
L. E.
2017
Utilization of corn cob and TiO2 photocatalyst thin films for dyes removal
.
Acta Chimica Slovenica
64
(
1
),
144
158
.
Örkün
Y.
,
Karatepe
N.
&
Yavuz
R.
2012
Influence of temperature and impregnation ratio of H3PO4 on the production of activated carbon from hazelnut shell
.
Acta Physica Polonica-Series A General Physics
121
(
1
),
277
.
Panneerselvam
P.
,
Morad
N.
&
Tan
K. A.
2011
Magnetic nanoparticle (Fe3O4) impregnated onto tea waste for the removal of nickel (II) from aqueous solution
.
Journal of Hazardous Materials
186
(
1
),
160
168
.
Paşka
O. M.
,
Păcurariu
C.
&
Muntean
S. G.
2014
Kinetic and thermodynamic studies on methylene blue biosorption sing corn-husk
.
Rsc Advances
4
(
107
),
62621
62630
.
Petrović
M.
,
Šoštarić
T.
,
Stojanović
M.
,
Milojković
J.
,
Mihajlović
M.
,
Stanojević
M.
&
Stanković
S.
2016
Removal of Pb2+ ions by raw corn silk (Zea mays L.) as a novel biosorbent
.
Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers
58
,
407
416
.
Petrović
M.
,
Šoštarić
T.
,
Stojanović
M.
,
Petrović
J.
,
Mihajlović
M.
,
Ćosović
A.
&
Stanković
S.
2017
Mechanism of adsorption of Cu2+ and Zn2+ on the corn silk (Zea mays L.)
.
Ecological Engineering
99
,
83
90
.
Pezhhanfar
S.
&
Zarei
M.
2021
Introduction of maize cob and husk for wastewater treatment; evaluation of isotherms and artificial neural network modeling
.
Journal of the Iranian Chemical Society
19
,
231
246
.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s13738-021-02301-0.
Ponce
J.
,
da Silva Andrade
J. G.
,
dos Santos
L. N.
,
Bulla
M. K.
,
Barros
B. C. B.
,
Favaro
S. L.
,
Hioka
N.
,
Caetano
W.
&
Batistela
V. R.
2021
Alkali pretreated sugarcane bagasse, rice husk and corn husk wastes as lignocellulosic biosorbents for dyes
.
Carbohydrate Polymer Technologies and Applications
2
,
100061
.
Qu
Y.
,
Kang
S.
,
Sun
J.
,
Zhang
L.
,
Sun
J.
,
Yang
S.
&
Yang
J.
2020
Synthesis of graphene oxide/corn cob composites and investigation of their adsorption performance of dye
. In:
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
.
IOP Publishing
.
1–3 May 2020, Zhuhai, China
.
Ramamoorthy
M.
,
Ragupathy
S.
,
Sakthi
D.
,
Arun
V.
&
Kannadasan
N.
2020
Synthesis of SnO2 loaded on corn cob activated carbon for enhancing the photodegradation of methylene blue under sunlight irradiation
.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
8
(
5
),
104331
.
Ranjbar
A.
,
Heidarpour
M.
,
Eslamian
S.
&
Shirvani
M.
2022
Investigating the performance of adsorbents made from the canola stalk for the removal of lead from aqueous solutions
.
Arabian Journal of Geosciences
15
(
19
),
1565
.
Reddy
P. M. K.
,
Verma
P.
&
Subrahmanyam
C.
2016
Bio-waste derived adsorbent material for methylene blue adsorption
.
Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers
58
,
500
508
.
Rehl
T.
,
Lansche
J.
&
Müller
J.
2012
Life cycle assessment of energy generation from biogas – Attributional vs. consequential approach
.
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
16
(
6
),
3766
3775
.
Ren
X.
,
Wang
S.
,
Jin
Y.
,
Xu
D.
&
Yin
H.
2020
Adsorption properties of reactive dyes on the activated carbon from corn straw prepared by microwave pyrolysis
.
Desalination and Water Treatment
200
,
296
303
.
Rosas-Castor
J. M.
,
Garza-González
M. T.
,
García-Reyes
R. B.
,
Soto-Regalado
E.
,
Cerino-Córdova
F. J.
,
García-González
A.
&
Loredo-Medrano
J. A.
2014
Methylene blue biosorption by pericarp of corn, alfalfa, and agave bagasse wastes
.
Environmental Technology
35
(
9
),
1077
1090
.
Sahoo
T. R.
&
Prelot
B.
2020
Adsorption processes for the removal of contaminants from wastewater: The perspective role of nanomaterials and nanotechnology
. In:
Nanomaterials for the Detection and Removal of Wastewater Pollutants
(Barbara Bonelli, Francesca S. Freyria, Ilenia Rossetti, Rajandrea Sethi, eds). Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, pp. 161–222
.
Sallau
A. B.
,
Aliyu
S.
&
Ukuwa
S.
2012
Biosorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution by corn cob powder
.
International Journal of Environment and Bioenergy
4
(
3
),
131
140
.
Sanghi
R.
&
Verma
P.
2013
Decolorisation of aqueous dye solutions by low-cost adsorbents: A review
.
Coloration Technology
129
(
2
),
85
108
.
Sepúlveda
L. A.
,
Cuevas
F. A.
&
Contreras
E. G.
2015
Valorization of agricultural wastes as dye adsorbents: Characterization and adsorption isotherms
.
Environmental Technology
36
(
15
),
1913
1923
.
Sharma
A.
,
Tomer
A.
,
Singh
J.
&
Chhikara
B. S.
2019
Biosorption of metal toxicants and other water pollutants by corn (maize) plant: A comprehensive review
.
Journal of Integrated Science and Technology
7
(
2
),
19
28
.
Solar
C.
,
Sardella
F.
,
Deiana
C.
,
Lago
R. M.
,
Vallone
A.
&
Sapag
K.
2008
Natural gas storage in microporous carbon obtained from waste of the olive oil production
.
Materials Research
11
,
409
414
.
Song
W.
,
Gao
B.
,
Zhang
T.
,
Xu
X.
,
Huang
X.
,
Yu
H.
&
Yue
Q.
2015
High-capacity adsorption of dissolved hexavalent chromium using amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites
.
Bioresource Technology
190
,
550
557
.
Song
W.
,
Gao
B.
,
Xu
X.
,
Xing
L.
,
Han
S.
,
Duan
P.
,
Song
W.
&
Jia
R.
2016
Adsorption–desorption behavior of magnetic amine/Fe3O4 functionalized biopolymer resin towards anionic dyes from wastewater
.
Bioresource Technology
210
,
123
130
.
Taha
N. A.
,
Zattot
A.
&
Mohamed
E.
2021
Modification of corn stalk for high-performance adsorption of Coomassie Brilliant Blue dye in simulated polluted water: Kinetic study
.
Global NEST Journal
23
(
2
),
201
208
.
Tan
X.-f.
,
Liu
S.-b.
,
Liu
Y.-g.
,
Gu
Y.-l.
,
Zeng
G.-m.
,
Hu
X.-j.
,
Wang
X.
,
Liu
S.-h.
&
Jiang
L.-h.
2017
Biochar as potential sustainable precursors for activated carbon production: Multiple applications in environmental protection and energy storage
.
Bioresource Technology
227
,
359
372
.
Tang
Y.
,
Zhao
Y.
,
Lin
T.
,
Li
Y.
,
Zhou
R.
&
Peng
Y.
2019
Adsorption performance and mechanism of methylene blue by H3PO4-modified corn stalks
.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
7
(
6
),
103398
.
Tang
Y.
,
Lin
T.
,
Jiang
C.
,
Zhao
Y.
&
Ai
S.
2021
Renewable adsorbents from carboxylate-modified agro-forestry residues for efficient removal of methylene blue dye
.
Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids
149
,
109811
.
Tejada-Tovar
C.
,
Villabona-Ortiz
A.
,
Ortega-Toro
R.
,
López-Génes
J.
&
Negrete-Palacio
A.
2021
Elimination of cadmium (II) in aqueaous solution using corn cob (Zea mays) in batch system: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium
.
Revista Mexicana de Ingeniería Química
20
(
2
),
1059
1077
.
Umpuch
C.
2015
Removal of green 40 from aqueous solutions by adsorption using organo-corn straw
.
Engineering and Applied Science Research
42
(
3
),
250
257
.
Umpuch
C.
&
Jutarat
B.
2013
Adsorption of organic dyes from aqueous solution by surfactant modified corn straw
.
International Journal of Chemical Engineering and Applications
4
(
3
),
134
.
Velmurugan
P.
,
Shim
J.
&
Oh
B.-T.
2016
Removal of anionic dye using amine-functionalized mesoporous hollow shells prepared from corn cob silica
.
Research on Chemical Intermediates
42
(
6
),
5937
5950
.
Vicinisvarri
I.
,
Kumar
S. S.
,
Aimi
N.
,
Norain
I.
&
Izza
N.
2014
Preparation and characterization of phosphoric acid activated carbon from Canarium odontophyllum (Dabai) nutshell for methylene blue adsorption
.
Research Journal of Chemistry and Environment
18
(
2
),
57
62
.
Vučurović
V. M.
,
Razmovski
R. N.
,
Miljić
U. D.
&
Puškaš
V. S.
2014
Removal of cationic and anionic azo dyes from aqueous solutions by adsorption on maize stem tissue
.
Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers
45
(
4
),
1700
1708
.
Wang
J.
,
Wu
F.
,
Wang
M.
,
Qiu
N.
,
Liang
Y.
,
Fang
S.
&
Jiang
X.
2010
Preparation of activated carbon from a renewable agricultural residue of pruning mulberry shoot
.
African Journal of Biotechnology
9
(
19
),
2762
2767
.